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Full text of "Polo centennial 1857-1957"

1872 



1957 



An Unbroken 
Service Record of 85 Years 




The Schryver Insurance Agency 
was eslablished in Polo in 1872 by 
M. E. Schryver I to offer the public 
complete insurance service. This ideal 
was continued by M. E. Schryver II 
and today Service is still the funda- 
mental keystone in conducting the 
Schryver Insurance Agency. We 
want to serve you. 




M. E. SCHRYVER I 



M. E. SCHRYVER II 



STRONG COMPANIES - STRONG POLICIES! 



Hartford Fire Insurance Co. 
Hartford Accident & Indemnity Co. 
United States Fidelity & Guarantee Co. 
Fire Association of Philadelphia 
Liverpool & London & Globe Ins. Co. 
New York Underwriters Ins. Co. 



The American Insurance Co. 

The Insurance Company of N. Amer. 

The Continental Insurance Co. 

The National Fire Ins. Co. 

The Ohio Casualty Ins. Co. 

Springfield Fire & Marine Ins. Co. 




Hartford Steam Boiler Insp. & Ins. Co. 

Still Looking Ahead 

For many years we have represented only the 
Companies of the highest character - Compan- 
ies that stand back of every policy in time of 
need. We will be happy to serve your insurance 
needs. 




Schryver Insurance Agency 



Jim 



Mart 



Phone 6-3002 



Polo, Illinois 




3 1516 00016 31 



Greetings and Thanks! 

Several factors influenced our community to undertake the planning and manage- 
ment of Polo's Centennial Celebration. One of these is the desire of most people to pliy 
tittmg tribute to the pioneers who came to this part of northern Illinois when it was a 
raw, trackless prairie with hostile Indians still roaming the area. We believe the people 
of Polo have just a little more appreciation of those pioneers whose acts vision and 
dreams generations ago resulted in the things we take pride in today. 

Another factor in our decision to join hands in the Centennial was the belief that 
our town, as do all towns, needed something in the way of a common goal that would 
draw our people together to blend their energies and personalities in one tremendous 
effort. The answer seemed to be the celebration you are attending June 16-22 We believe 
the Centennial has enjoyed greater cooperation and the unbounded enthusiasm of more 
people, many more, than any other single undertaking in our city's history. 

While the two factors already mentioned are in themselves worthy of recognition as 
a sound basis for deciding to go ahead there was yet another and more compelling reas- 
on which led us into affirmative action, a reason why the Centennial's influence will be 
felt tor many years to come as it serves a greater purpose. As much as we revere the 
past and respect the present, we must of necessity be concerned as well for the future 
of our community. We look forward, therefore, to a more progressive, more active and 
more service-minded pattern for Polo's future. This is, in our view, the chief reason for 
the Centennial. 

And now that the pioneers have been duly and suitably honored, the present award- 
ed Its proper perspectivein our community sun, and our future course plotted we take 
time out to express our deep appreciation for the unexampled hard work and the down- 
right unsurpassed loyalty of our citizens. The "'esprit de corps" of all has had a salutary 
etiect upon everyone connected in even the slightest degree with the Centennial. 

To every visitor we simply say, "Welcome! We are glad you have come to join us 
as we pay tribute m our hearts to the people of another era "for the foundations they 
laid tor us of today. Every town has its own particular brand of welcome We want ours 
to be warm and friendly so you will remember Polo's Centennial as one of beauty and 
charm, not of physical aspects of our com.munity but of its people . . . your hosts " Come 
back and see us! r- r- j . c 

,,,^.^^^CVTIYE COMMITTEE-John Phalen, J. Anthony Smith, Doris Weaver Douglas 
White. 

A DIRECTORS— John Phalen, president; Douglas White, Evan Reck, Grant Rigcrg Jr 
Annabel McGrath, Everett Webster, Mrs. Richard Schell, Rev. Ira Wilson C R Clothier' 
Nathan Mount, Eddie Ports, Evangeline H. Donaldson, E. H. Cassens, J. Anthony Smith' 
Mrs. Helen Bentley, Harry A. Wolf, Axel Olsen, Ross W. Hostetter, John Coffman' 
Charles Joiner, Miss Delia Miller, Miss Pearle Joiner, John Heckman, Mrs Annabel 
Winders Kopp, J. J. Ports, George Strickler (1876-1956) 



Page 1 



SAUK VALLEY COLLEGE 
L.R.C. 

099039 




Zenas Aplington, 1815-1862 

Zenas Aplington came to Polo, a youth of 22, imbued with 
a pioneering spirit that was to advance him from a sawmill 
hand in 1837 to state senator and leading citizen in 1858. If 
George Washington can be called the Father of His Country, 
Zenas Aplington can be called not only the father of Polo but 
also the city's godfather. 

Our City's founder was born in Broome county. New 
York, Dec. 24, 1815. His zeal as a worker and dreamer prob- 
ably brought him to this western country where he was quick 
to grasp opportunities while others lagged. 

Succesively he was a sawmill hand, carpenter, black- 
smith, merchant, real estate dealer and promoter of Ogle 
county, state senator and soldier. He was killed in action in 
the Battle of Corinth May 9, 1862, cut off at the very height 
of his usefulness as a citizen at the age of 47. 

Zenas Aplington's likeness has not yet been chiseled in 
granite as suggested by the late Dr. J. H. More but he will 
live in the hearts of future generations as the Founder of our 
City. He is the man to whom our Centennial Celebration is 
dedicated, the man whom we all honor during this week's 
observance. 



Page 2 




Foreword 

Too many years ago to remember a wise philosopher once said, "let us cultivate 
our gardens." Taken in its broader meaning the wise philosopher was urging the people 
of his day to work for the betterment not only of themselves but of their particular unit 
of society. 

During this week of the Centennial we pause to pay tribute to the men and women 
whose bequests to the community in days gone by we enjoy so much today. They "culti- 
vated their gardens" as we hope to do. 

No one can appreciate the hours upon hours of effort and preparation that have gone 
into plans for this brief span of seven days. The entire panorama of Polo's life during 
the First Hundred Years will be brought to life — the arrival of the pioneers in the late 
1820s; the development of the area by those who came pouring in from the East and 
South to build upon the foundations already laid; the present in which we are still 
building and perhaps more important, conserving. Pageantry, displays and entertain- 
ment will portray the manner in which Polo citizens have reacted to their assignments 
down through the years. 

If one word typifies the zeal and purpose of our people in these First Hundred Years 
it is "spirit." The French call it "esprit de corps." In our every day language A. D. 1957 
some people call it zip; others call it fire. Whatever word you choose to describe the activ- 
ities and work of our people you will see its results in terms of today's achievement. 

Our people, therefore, are united in the one common goal of being an American 
community. It is with this ideal in mind that we dedicate ourselves to the future so 
that with each passing year something may be done to enrich the lives of our people 
and our country. 

We face the future with confidence in ourselves strengthened by a greater know- 
ledge and more vivid memories of the past that provided the foundation upon which 
future progress must rest as the years unfold ahead. 

CENTENNIAL PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Gifford C. Terry and Charles J. Wolf, Co-Chairmen 

Russell Poole William Dew Lydia Wolfe 

Everett Webster Bert Nordgren Henry Lindemann 

Annabel McGrath Mrs. A. O. Swanson Mrs. Neva Baker 



Page 3 



' - - •r.-W^. 



^ 1 i I 




Sunday Morning on Mason and Franklin in 1957 




*\ > 




Six-Ox Team in Polo's Earliest Street Scene (Undated) 



Page 4 



Our Family Tree 



I— Buffalo Grove 



In any history of Polo due regard must 
be given to its direct lineal "ancestor," Buf- 
falo Grove, the first white settlement be- 
tween Ogie's Ferry, now Dixon, and Galena. 

Roaming white men in the early 1820's 
had discovered lead in the hills of what is 
now Jo Daviess county. They reached the 
area via the Mississippi River then up Fev- 
er River. 

Listening to the stories of men who had 
returned to Ft. Clark, now Peoria, a man 
named Kellogg set out in the spring of 1825 to 
see for himself. Instead of going via the Mis- 
sissippi Mr. Kellogg made his journey over 
the rolling prairies, skirting the woods as a 
precaution against ambush by the Indians. 

Crossing the Rock River at about the 
present location of Dixon, Kellogg passed 
through the prairie country a few miles east 
of Polo, bore northwest passing West Grove 
and continued on to Galena. 

Kellogg's journey thus successfully com- 
pleted was the signal for others to set out. 
Many others did, some with teams but more 
on foot. All camped out along the way over 



what soon became known as Kellogg's Trail. 

Use of this trail was soon proved to be 
too circuitous taking the travelers too far to 
the east. They wanted a more direct route. 

Thus it was that John Boles set out in 
the spring of 1826 for the lead mines. Boles 
left the beaten path, crossed Rock River far- 
ther down than Kellogg, just about where the 
I.C.R.R. bridge is today in Dixon. 

Boles passed about a mile east of Polo, 
north to White Oak Grove just west of For- 
reston, thence on to Crane's Grove and so on 
to Galena. His route being many miles shor- 
ter than Kellogg's soon became the choice of 
most travelers. It was called Boles's Trail and 
for three years it was used exclusively. 

In the spring of 1827 travel began early 
in the season. Elisha Doty, an ancestor of the 
present generation of Dotys in Polo, arrived 
at Dixon in the month of March, attempted 
to cross the ice but had to turn back. He said 
200 teams had to wait for a crossing until 
the ice went out. 

Isaac Chambers who will be mentioned 
later passed through the Buffalo Grove area 




Polo vfas grown up before World War II 

Page 5 




Your City Serves Its Citizens 

"Rank and file" municipal administrations of the century ago and those 
in the decades that followed paved the way for the wide variety of interest- 
ing services we enjoy in Polo today. We here pay tribute to those who caused 
the City to be platted with wide streets now edged with beautiful shade trees 
and who laid the foundations for the municipal improvements we take for 
granted today. 

Public library service, modern street lighting, sanitation, health and 
police protection — all of these and a host of others were begun by our 
predecessors. 

We, your City Administration of 1957, pledge our combined efforts to 
carry on the tradition of efficient municipal government. To this end we 
have just completed a Code of General Ordinances under which the city is 
now governed. We speak for the whole City when we say, "Welcome!" 



Polo City Administration 



First Ward 

Thurston Sarber 

Elery Shank 



E. H. Cassens, Mayor 

Second Ward 
Dan Fierheller 
Harry A. Wolf 



Third Ward 
Robert Sweet 
James Sarber 



Evan Reck, Clerk - Keith McGuire, Treasurer - R. C. Minnier, Magistrate 



Page 6 



A Polo Firm 
1919 ^ - 1957 




Centennial 
Congratulations 

* 
LENNOX HEATING 

and Air Conditioning 

SINCE 1921 

* 
HOTPOINT APPLIANCES 

• 

SKELGAS 

L. P. and Natural Gas 

APPLIANCES 

* 
BPS PAINTS 



Ports Hardware 



Phone 6-2332 



in the summer of 1827. He was so struck with 
the beauty of the setting that he determined 
to make it his home. He became known later 
as the first permanent white settler in what 
is known as Ogle county. 

John Ankeney moved from southern Illi- 
nois in 1827 to Galena where he started farm- 
ing on Smallpox Creek. In December of 1829 
he came through western Ogle county with a 
party surveying a road, liked the landscape 
at Buffalo Grove and on Christmas Day put 
his mark on a tree. 'Nanusha," Indian name 
for Buffalo Grove, had its first symbol of set- 
tlement. Ankeney's claim was near the 
bridge over Buffalo Creek on the "Galena 
Road." 

Ankeney then returned to Smallpox 
Creek for his wife and family, firm in the be- 
lief the first claim at Buffalo Grove would 
be honored according to the customs of the 
time. But fate intervened as we shall soon 
see. 

While Ankeney was gone for his family 
Mr. Chambers, mentioned above, came down 
from Galena with his. He stopped at White 
Oak Grove just west of Forreston presum- 
ably considering a claim there. In the end he 
returned to the Buffalo Grove site he had 
fallen in love with on his journey hereabouts 
in 1827, due to the abundance of timber. 

The very spot he chose was the one 
marked out by Mr. Ankeney earlier that year. 
Mr. Chambers had plans for building a hotel 
for travelers about 30 rods above the present 
bridge over Buffalo Creek. 

While he was engaged in these prelim- 
inaries he was surprised by the appearance 
of Mr. Ankeney who had returned with his 
family to take possession of his claim and 
to build a home. Mr. Ankeney was no less 
surprised to find his claim in possession of 
another. 

The incident was not precisely agreeable 
to either party but in the end Mr. Ankeney 
moved on about 100 rods farther down- 
stream where he erected a "Public House," 
although the nearest road was two miles a- 
way. 

"The Grove," it seemed, was well on the 
way to becoming an island in a prairie, as it 
had two "hotels" and no road, since Mr. 
Chambers and Mr. Ankeney had been too 
busy disputing over the claim to get any- 
thing done. 

Having completed their houses the two 
men next turned their attention to a survey 
necessary to divide their property. Other 
boundaries were useless for Mr. Ankeney 
could claim the territory all the way to the 
Mississippi and Mr. Chambers could be the 
lord of all the land eastward to the Rock 
River! 

Being practical men they devised a way. 
One clear night when the moon v>'as not 
shining they went together by starlight to 



Page 7 






Buffalo Grove School — New in 1898 — Teacher, Clayton Smith 



the south end of the grove and from a red 
oak stump they started towards the North 
Star. As they proceeded they hacked the 
trees and this hne became the boundary be- 
tween them. 

But this was not the end of their dis- 
sensions. More was to come. Mr. Ankeney 
and Mr. Chambers went to Ogie's Ferry, la- 
ter to be known as Dixon, and began staking 
out each his own road which was at no place 
more than a half mile apart. 

You have guessed rightly. Ankeney's 
road passed by his "hotel" and Mr. Cham- 
bers's road passed by his. Travelers were not 
hesitant about taking a road northward to 
Buffalo Grove but the question that perplex- 
ed them was WHICH road to take. 

So it was that competition set in early 
in this region. Both Chambers and Ankeney 
each began immediately to make his house 
attractive and to induce travelers to choose 
it. 

Rivalry and jealousy marked the assoc- 
iation of Chambers and Ankeney as long as 
they lived in Buffalo Grove. Each did his best 
to drive customers away from the other and 
into his own "hotel." Each chopped down 
trees so they fell across the other's road and 
other irritants were employed. 

Oliver W. Kellogg who is believed to be 
the "Mr. Kellogg" who established Kellogg's 
Trail back in 1825, was unhappy with his 
claim at Burr Oak Grove in Stephenson 



county. In 1831 he came to Buffalo Grove 
where Chambers was being worsted by An- 
keney in this early battle for business. It 
was not long until Chambers agreed to sell 
his claim to Kellogg who took up the rivalry 
where Chambers left off. 

Chambers moved about six miles to the 
north and west and his place became known 
as Chambers' Grove and the neighborhood 
is still known by that name today, at least in 
the memory of older citizens. 

It must be remembered that all these set- 
tlements had been made here and there in 
the midst of Indians. The Winnebagoes had 
not yet left the country; the Pottawatomies 
still lived on their old hunting grounds. The 
Sacs and Foxes, even though they had ceded 
their lands to the United States by the Trea- 
ty of 1804, were still around. 

Rumors of an Indian war upon the set- 
tlers were rife throughout this region follow- 
ing the annual council of the Redskins in 
"the first moon in June" in 1831. Many bor- 
der atrocities were perpetrated upon the set- 
tlers among which was the murder of Wil- 
liam Durley in April 1832 at the edge of Buf- 
falo Grove, now the farm of John Reid (1957) 
just west of Polo, and others here and there 
in scattered places. 

Among historians some question has ris- 
en as to whether these atrocities were not 
forced upon the Indians. It has never been 
settled. But regardless of its causes pro and 



Page 8 



1907 




1957 



50 YEARS of PROFESSIONAL 
SERVICE to the COMMUNITY 

While Polo celebrates its Centennial our Store will be 
celebrating its Half-Centennial. During our Half Century 
our Pharmacists have filled more than 100,000 Prescrip- 
tions, a record we are proud to have made. Professional 
Service by Professional Pharmacists. 

Best Wishes to Polo in its Centennial Celebration 

CLOTHIER'S DRUG STORE 



C. Roland Clothier 
1907— 



Robert R. Clothier 
1945— 




Congratulations to Polo 

On Its 

Centennial Year 



Through the efforts of R. R. Street & Co., the Dry 
Cleaning industry has made great progress over a period of 
80 years. We of the Polo Cleaners are proud to be users of 
Street's famous strong soap formula 886 as well as its other 
products ... so we can offer you the very finest in Dry 
Cleaning! 

OTHER SERVICES RENDERED 

• Laundry • Hat Blocking 

• Mending • Rug Cleaning 

POLO DRY CLEANERS 

JOHN AND DORIS FRAYSER 



Page 9 




1957 FIRE DEPARTMENT— Front row: Harold 
Drenner, Harold Brooks, Fred Galor, Cecil Hoyle, 
Everett Webster, Dawson Bunker; middle row, Ken- 
neth Brown, Steve Stanich, John Powell, Harold 



Glaman, Emerson Byrd, Donald Galor; back row: 
Russell Brown, Axel Olsen Jr.,, John Lang, Marvin 
Sarber, Robert Poffenberger, Chief, Robert Mc- 
pherson, Clarence Camery. 



Modernized Fire Protection 

From the days of the old hook and ladder teams Polo has been known 
for its efficient fire department. In those days gone by Polo teams held state 
and national championships at various times. 

While competition between towns is no longer possible, with heavy 
equipment in use today, Polo is proud of its firemen and their unsurpassed 
record of volunteer accomplishments. Rare is the occasion when the fire 
trucks require more than 90 seconds for their departure; often it is as little 
as 60 seconds. In fighting fires every second counts. 

Our Fire Protection District, a type of organization unknown 100 years 
ago, reaps rich rewards in protection by providing the department per- 
sonnel with adequate equipment of modern design. 



Polo Fire Protection District 



Herbert C. Hays 
President 



THE TRUSTEES 

Henry Kitzmiller 
Vice-President 



Robert E. Jones 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Page 10 



We Write 

Insurance 

Policies To Cover 

ALL RISKS 

Ask about our All-Risk 
Policy for Homes! 

EVANGELINE H. 

DONALDSON 

Insurance Agency 

Phone 6-0312 



RAND 

SKm, 



For MEN 




For WOMEN 

PolNLParrot 

SHOES F0R|>B0YS and OIRlt 

For CHILDREN 

MUENCH'S 

Shoes & Hosiery 

For The Entire Family 
Phone 6-0582 Ball Band Rubbers 



f?-*-^' 




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Ti^ — ... ..ii^K^m 

r '. t ^> (J^ .J D o A M p B t L I 



This was the home of John D. Campbell, 
county judge, on East Dixon Street, as it ap- 
peared in 1872. It was the site of Campbell's 
deer herd. 



con the Blackhawk War itself is a historical 
fact. It lasted only a few months and in this 
area it was marked by Stillman's defeat near 
Stillman Valley. History knows the battle as 
Stillman's Run. 

At the close of the hostilities the few 
settlers in the country hereabouts prior to 
the war returned and many more with them. 
After 1833, the influx of settlers assumed the 
proportions, for those days at least, of a 
flood. Indian scares were ended, the bars 
were down. 

Among those that came were names 
well known during the generations that fol- 
lowed, some of them still represented in the 
area today. The Waterburys, Talbots, Dotys, 
Sanfords, Shoemakers, Wales, and many, 
many others came immediately after the 
Blackhawk War. Among them was a young 
man of 22, Zenas Aplington, engaged as a 
sawmill hand by Oliver W. Kellogg, who v/as 
to be heard from many times, all favorable, 
in the years that followed. 

In the years after the Blackhawk War 
(1832) in which Buffalo Grove served for a 
brief time as the camp of General Dodge's 
party which was protecting the arm3"'s rear 
as Blackhawk was being chased up Rock 
River, Buffalo Grove prospered and grew. 



Page 11 





Gone With The Years 



In quick succession came the post office, 
school, grist mill, sawmill, township govern- 
ment, county government; the carpenters and 
builders and doctors; merchants, lawyers, 
milliners. 

The countryside with its broad expanses 
of rich prairie soil was literally crawling 
with men who loved the land; with them 
were their women and children working like 
beavers to make a home and future for 
themselves. What is now Eagle Point, Woo- 
sung, Lincoln, Brookville, Buffalo and Pine 
Creek were thickly settled in a matter of a 
few years. Land was sold by the government 
at $1.25 per acre to the settlers. 

One writer said "when we came from 
Dixon in 1837 and came up on the rising 
ground three miles north of that place, there 
was not a single foot of ground to be seen 
which the hand of man had not touched." 

By 1837 E. S. Waterbury wrote, "many 
of the prairie flowers have dissappeared be- 
ing destroyed by the cattle and the fires." 

In the late Forties railroad talk became 
widespread in the fast growing region north 
of the Rock River towards Buffalo Grove, 
White Oak Grove, Kellogg's Grove and on 
towards Galena. The settlers needed lumber 
for their farm improvements and carpenters 
in the towns needed it for home construction; 
farmers needed transportation to get their 
wheat and corn to market and livestock was 



Drink Lots of 



Fairvieiv Dairy- 
Grade "^" 

MILK 



Drink an EXTRA glass every day. 

"You NEVER outgrow 
your need for Milk!" 



Save 



on your 



FAIRVIEW 
ICE CREAM 

Rich and Wholesome 

Special Prices 

In 5'Qallon Lots! 

* 

Dairy Products 

FRESH 

With Each Delivery 

* 

FAIRVIEW 

FARM DAIRY 

RICHARD DONALDSON 

Distributor 

Phone 6-1492 



Page 12 




Pine Crest Cheese Factory 

Manufacturers of 

Swiss and American Cheese 

* 

Retail and Wholesale 

* 

Located Five Miles East of Polo 

Telephone 6-0628 



Page 13 



w 



-"^^^ 




Mason street's north side west of the Ex- 
change boasted only a handful of business 
places when the above picture was taken be- 
fore 1880. Only the Bargain Store had ven- 
tured west of Division known for many years 
as Freeport Road. The Town was emerging 



from a frontier trading center with wood 
structures for businesses to one with brick 
buildings. This picture was taken after the 
fire that destroyed 14 of them in the first 
block at the right in the above picture. The 
view is from east to west. 



Allis Chalmers ♦ ♦ ♦ ^Aassey-Harris 



Dodge 



Plymouth 



THE FERGUSON LINE 

We're happy to be a part of the business life of the community 
in its Centennial Year. Our Congratulations to Polo! 

POLO MOTOR COMPANY 

SPENCER GENTRY - - MARVIN SARBER 



Page 14 



As Near As 
YOUR Phone- 




A Market 
for Cattle 




POLO PHONES 

Weighing Station, 6-0a62 

Paul Keenan, 6-0862 

Elburn, 2651 



ELBURN 

Packing Co, 

Weighing Station, Polo, 111. 



rapidly showing a surplus above the needs of 
the local populations. 

Economic considerations were spelling 
the end of Buffalo Grove but the people, es- 
pecially those who were content to rest on 
their laurels, did not realize it until it was 
too late. 

The Illinois Central Railroad which had 
just been incorporated in 1851 had made at 
least two surveys from Dixon through the 
Buffalo Grove area to Freeport. One of them 
touched at Buffalo Grove. This eventuality 
was the crisis that went unheeded and un- 
solved. The coming of the railroad was op- 
posed by certain property owners who re- 
fused to give land for the right of way. 

A young man who had come to Buffalo 
Grove in 1837 as a sawmill hand owned a 
farm to the north and east of the village in 
the year 1851. Two years before he had 
bought the first frame "dwelling, built in 1836 
by William Merritt, and moved it to his farm. 

When the leaders in Buffalo Grove re- 
fused to welcome the railroad by giving land 
for its right of way this young man, then in 
his Thirties, opened the door. He gave the 
ICRR its right of way through his land and 
was given the honor of naming the new town. 

His name was Zenas Aplington. The 
name of the new town was Polo, after Marco 
Polo, the Venetian traveler. 

This, in brief, is the story of Buffalo 
Grove, the first settlement in Ogle county, 
and one of the very first in the vast territory 
that is northwestern Illinois. 




West Ogle had some fine driving teams, one 
of which was that driven by the late Linus 
Magne who came over from towards Mt. 
Morris to take a Polo girl, Belva Garman, as 
his bride. Photo is about 1911. 



The first tax levy for "road" purposes in 
Polo was effected by Ordinance No. 10 which 
required collecti<)n of 15c per $100 valuation 
for improvement of the streets. The date was 
May of 1857. 



Page 15 



Meet Your Friends 
at the 

Cozy Cafe 



IV e Aim to Please' 



Cec & Joyce Hoyle 

111 So. Franklin Ave. 
POLO, ILLINOIS 



At PACE'S 
'Fresh" Means 



Baked 
Every Day! 



Full Line of Baked Goods — Special orders 
for Anniversary Cakes, Rolls, etc. 



Pacers Bakery 

Clark and Angle 




Buick - Chevrolet - Pontiac 



Dial 6-0962 



Bomberger and Son 



SALES & SERVICE 



Page 16 



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FIRST 
FIRST 
FIRST 

FIRST 

FIRST 

FIRST 

FIRST 

FIRST 

FIRST 

FIRST 

FIRST 
FIRST 

FIRST 

FIRST 



Early Polo Area Firsts 

WHITE MAN to reach Polo region: Mr. Oliver W. Kellogg in 1825. 

SETTLER in Ogle County - Isaac Chambers in 1830. 

CLAIM made in the county by John Ankeney Christmas Day in 
1829 on the banks of Buffalo Creek. 

WHEAT - first crop of winter wheat raised near Buffalo Grove 
in 1833. 

POSTMASTER - Elkanah P. Bush at the Buffalo Grove Post Of- 
fice established in 1833. 

WHITE CHILD - Cyrus Doty, son of Elisha Doty, born Sept 4 
1834, at Buffalo Grove. ' 

SCHOOL TAUGHT - at the home of Oliver W. Kellogg in 1834-5 
at Buffalo Grove. 

LAWYER in Ogle County - V. A. Bogue, resident of Buffalo 
Grove, about 1835. 

GRISTMILL - completed in 1836 by Joseph Wilson and James 
Talbot. 

SAWMILL in Ogle County - erected by John D. Stevenson on 
Buffalo Creek in 1836. 

RAILROAD SURVEY - for the Illinois Central R, R. in 1852. 

STORE - kept by Zenas Aplington . . . opened in a frame building 
moved from Buffalo Grove to North Franklin street in 1852 

BRICK BUILDING - on northeast corner of Mason-Franklin in- 
tersection erected in 1853 - also by Zenas Aplington. 

NEWSPAPER - Polo Sentinel established by F. O Austin in 
October, 1856. 






Public Service Company 



n 



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Page 17 






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In this interesting photo you see how 
Polo looked in the early 1880s. The camerman 
stood in the middle of Mason street peering 
towards the setting sun. It was summer. The 
boys were in the "ol swimmin' hole" while 



the men, overheated from political discus- 
sions, could cool off at the town pump. Polo 
was maturing now — the well had a band- 
stand over it. Somebody's dream was ma- 
terializing — the street was being improved 



THERE IS A 




In YOUR Future! 



SMITH MOTOR CO. 

Your Friendly FORD Dealer 



Phone 6-0842 



Polo 



Page 18 



1 



Distinctive 




^^^V 


APPAREL for 




^■■^^^kJL^' 




WOMEN 




^r^ 




TONI TODD & VICKY VAUGHN 








DRESSES 








SARA LEE SKIRTS 

LA CHARME BLOUSES 

LADY LOVE LINGERIE 

ALBA HOSIERY 


bred Krum 

Auctioneer 


JANE JORDAN SPORTSWEAR 


Household Goods — Closing Out 


* 


Sales — Real Estate — City Property 


hazePs ladies' shop 

HAZEL C. FOUKE 


SEE ME FOR DATES 

DIAL 6-1064 


Clean - Comfortable 


Paints 


Hotel Rooms 

Night ■ Week - Month 


Wallpaper 




Painting and House Cleaning 




Supplies of All Kinds 

• 


\^^/ 


BROOKS 


Marco Polo Hotel 


Paint Store 

Harold and Goldie 


Phone 6-0072 


Phone 6-1512 


Polo 



Page 19 



Chuck Garrison 

Phone 6-2452 



Distributor of 

PHILLIPS 

PETROLEUM 

PRODUCTS 

Gas - Fuel Oil & Grease 




• DIAMONDS 

• WATCHES 

• JEWELRY 

Watch Repairing 

T>. A. Stenmark 



Ph. 6-2784 



Polo 




You Get Fast 



Service 



With 






When you buy SURGE Dairy Equipment you are GUARANTEED 
quick service in emergencies PLUS regular inspections. I am on call ANY 
TIME YOU NEED MEl So when you buy your next Milker make it a 
SURGE. For the latest information on pipe line milking systems, Surge 
Service and other Surge Dairy Farm Equipment contact: 

YOUR AUTHORIZED SURGE SERVICE DEALER 

VERNON GOOD 



Phone 6-4203 



POLO, ILL. 



104 S. Congress 



Page 20 




Above is an undated photo of the IC sta- 
tion that predates the present one which was 
built in 1907 and dedicated with a big cele- 
bration. The station in the picture was erec- 
ted in 1860, the same year the freight house 
was built. One sees in the background what 
appears to be the old water tank which 
quenched the thirst of puffing locomotives. 
Its water supply was pumped from the IC-Q 
junction. The tank was located in Central 
Park a short distance south of Mason street 
while the station was farther south. The 
"iron horse" appears to be of the vintage of 
the 1890s. It was pulling a passenger which 
has just finished handling the express and 
mail. After the new station was opened the 
old one was moved south, still stands but is 
slated to be razed this summer, another con- 
nection with the past soon to join many oth- 
ers in limbo. 



Many pioneer settlements were named 
"Grove" like Crane's Grove, West Grove, 
White Oak Grove, Kellogg's Grove and Buf- 
falo Grove. The groves of trees have been 
described as magnificent, literally genera- 
tions old for they had never been touched by 
the hand of man. Truly the trees were mon- 
archs. Trees in the groves were huge, larger 
even than the largest ones in Polo for the 
oldest and largest trees of today were plant- 
ed in 1878, hence are only 79 years old; even 
today they are only babies in the world of 
trees. 



Water Systems 

for Better Living 

• PLUMBING 

• HEATING 

• DRAIN SYSTEMS 

• TRENCHING 

* 

KOHLER 

Plumbing Fixtures 

* 

Nathan Mount 

Phone 6-0982 



1902 



1957 



BRACKEN'S 

Oldest Name on Mason St. 



Visit our Store during the Centennial! 
Women's Dresses, Coats, Skirts, Blouses 
and Handbags. Also full line of Chil- 
dren's Dresses. 



BRACKEN 

Style Shop 

Robt. Bracken, Mgr. 



Page 21 




History recorded that Pearson Shoemaker 
built a hotel on the site of the present Park- 
side in 1855-56. The original Orient House 
is shown in the inset as it was soon after 
the Civil War. In 1878 Pearson Shoemaker 
was described as "builder and present pro- 



prietor" of the Orient. Compare the above 
photo of the later Orient with that of the 
small inset which is probably the only pic- 
ture of the original 1855-56 Orient in exist- 
ence. The earlier Orient had five windows, no 
bay. The later one six windows with a bay. 





We Render A 

Complete Insurance Service 




NOTARY 

PUBLIC 

SERVICE 


FIRE 

AUTOMOBILE 

LIABILITY 




For a complete c 
Insure youi 

Scholl's 

Res. 6-3912 


overage and quick payment of claims - 
• car in Farmers Auto of Pekin! 

Insurance Agency 

POLO Off. 6-0222 



Page 22 




Washing 
Greasing 
Polishing 

ATLAS Tires — ATLAS Batteries 




HANK'S 

Standard Service 

Dial 6-9132 



RCA VICTOR 
RADIO- TV 



SUNBEAM 
APPLIANCES 

* 

GENERAL ELECTRIC 
TABLE APPLIANCES 



WIKOFF RADIO 
SERVICE 



Polo, 111. 



Phone 6-3622 



Choice 

Corn Fed 

Beef 

• Quarters 

• Halves 

• Retail 



Frozen 
Foods 




Once a week custom slaughtering the year 'round— Home 
Cured HICKORY SMOKED Hams & Bacon- Juicy Fresh Meat 



OUR BEST 

WISHES 

TO POLO . • • 



ON ITS 

FIRST 

100 YEARS 



Page 23 



BUD'S 

Barber Shop 

Beard Trimming A 
Specialty 

Lester (Bud) Weaver 

Proprietor 
PHONE 6-3052 




COAL 

ROOFING 
SIDING 

& 
FENCING 

Howard Slifer 

Phone 6-2662 




One Grade - BETTER BRED ^ The Best! 

Quality is Our Best Product 

Burman^s Hatchery & Feeds 



113 N. Franklin Ave. 



Phone 6-1622 



Page 24 




This interesting photo of a part of Polo's 
business street in the 60s shows the first Or- 
ient House at the right rear. An early photo- 
grapher made this shot before the well ap- 
peared in the center of the intersection, prob- 
ably in the late Sixties, since all that part 
destroyed in the "great conflagration" of 
1856 had been rebuilt with brick. It was a 
busy day with lots of bobsleds and wagons 



clogging the street, more than 60 of them in 
this one block. That part of Mason street ap- 
pears as it is today except for Barber's new 
building on the corner at the left, and the 
two towards the east end. Aplington's brick 
store was built in 1853 and in the photo here 
it appears to have included the first three, 
from the cornice at the top. The Polo Theater 
is the only recent new building in that block. 



V. The Friendly Store ./* 



ZENITH - ADMIRAL - CORONADO - SYLVAIVIA 

APPLIANCES and TELEVISION 

SPORTING GOODS - HARDWARE - PAINTS 

AUTO ACCESSORIES - FOOTWEAR 

ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 




R» L» Shipman, Proprietor 

"We Service What We Sell!" 




Page 25 SAUK VALLEY CULLEGt 

^-^'^ 099039 




How much times have changed in the 
last 100 years is indicated by the sign on the 
telephone pole: "Do Not Enter!" When James 
Mosher built "Mosher Hall" shown in the a- 
bove picture horse traffic was becoming a 
problem. At that time as many as 150 teams 
jammed into Polo on a single day. That was 



1855. Mosher Hall was used for social and 
civic functions, for church services and for 
school purposes at various times. It is now 
one of the historic landmarks of Our Town. 
It was located on what for many ye-ars was 
called Freeport Road. James Mosher's grand- 
daughter, Dr. Louise Keator, still lives there. 



Service Has ♦ ♦ ♦ 

♦ . ♦ Built Our Business 



Philco - Motorola 

Radio - Television • Refrigeration - Signs 



KNIFS APPLIANCE 



309 S. Division St. 



Dial 6-3362 



Polo 



Page 26 



Congratulations To Polo On 
Its 100th Birthday! 



Melvin Funeral Home 



Congratulations ♦ . ♦ 



from one old 
timer to another 





IT BEATS 
AS IT CLEANS 
AS IT SWEEPS 



Best Wishes To 
Polo From ♦ ♦ ♦ 
A Newcomer! 

• FURNITURE 

• RUGS & LINOLEUM 

• CARPETING 

• FLOOR TILING 



See Us During the 
CENTENNIAL 



Polo Furniture Store 



Model 
64 



Don Seidel 



Phone 6-0272 
Lyle Melvin - Russell Brown 



Page 27 



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Much speculation was abroad in Buffalo Grove from the time railroad talk began until the route from Dixon 
to Freeport actually was determined. This map, hand-drawn and colored, is dated August 4, 1851. Two 
routes had been surveyed from Dixon to Freeport, one of them touching Buffalo Grove, the other about a 
mile to the east. Text of the letter written on this map appears on page 69. 

Page 28 



Our Family Tree 



II ■ Polo 



Buffalo Grove had prospered in the years 
after the Sacs and Foxes, the straggling rem- 
nants of Pottawatomies and Winnebagoes, 
left forever their erstwhile hunting grounds 
between the Rock and the Mississippi Riv- 
ers. The future seemed bright as the village 
approached those mid-nineteenth century 
days. Trade was active; the prairies were no 
more. The village boasted a population of 
1,100 and all was well . . . almost. Nothing 
could happen to them. 

But it did. Change. Talk of the railroad 
had been heard for several years and now it 
was upon the village, that is, nearly all of 
it . . . all of it except those obstinate brethren 
who steadfastly refused to accept progress 
in the form of the railroad. That's why there 
is a Polo and why Our Town is celebrating 
its 100th birthday. 

How Polo came to be is an old, old story, 
but it's as American as apple sauce and 
pumpkin pie, a story while old is still new 
to those who have never read it. It's a story 
worth little outside Our Town, yet its in- 
gredients are those that have made America 
great. That's why the story is worth telling 
and retelling to the generations that appear 
from time to time. 

When the pro-status-quo citizens in Buf- 
falo Grove snubbed the railroad by refusing 



free right of way through their lands, a group 
of younger men extended the hand of fel- 
lowship. The leader, Founder of Our Town, 
was only 36 years old in 1851 when the times 
produced the man. 

The result of Buffalo Grove's snub was 
this: the Illinois Central Railroad which was 
headed straight for that village veered to the 
right, headed north and passed it about a mile 
on its left. It went where it was wanted and 
that was straight through Zenas Aplington's 
farm. The year of decision was 1851. 

Buffalo Grove's fate was therewith seal- 
ed forever until now its former glory ceases 
to live except in the minds of a mere hand- 
ful of Our Town's citizens who heard the 
pioneer story from their elders who got it 
from those who lived it . . . and others who 
look with reverence, almost, upon another 
time that is mellowed by the passing years. 

And so it was that Zenas Aplington, the 
sawmill hand of 1837, was at the head of the 
pack in planning for the town that bears the 
name he gave it. In 1849 he had purchased 
the first frame house built by Wm. Merritt 
in 1836 in Buffalo Grove and moved it to his 
farm northeast of the village. 

After Charles W. Joiner (grandfather of 
the present Charles W. and Alvin Joiner) 
had surveyed the original "Town of Polo" 



LIVESTOCK 

and General 

HAULING 

Prompt, Dependable 

SERVICE 

J, H, DITZLER 
& SONS 



Phone 6-0992 



Polo 




Have You Seen a Movie Lately? 

Movies are Truly 
Better Than Ever! 

Polo Theatre 

DON BOWEN 



Page 29 




Wailing for the Parade — Mason Street Scene 1880s 



Keckler^s 

Agricultural Store 


POLO 

FLOWER SHOP 

OREGON 


Seeds - Fertilizers 


GREENHOUSES 

• 


Farm Supplies 


FLOWERS 


• 


FOR 


Ever-Soft 


ALL OCCASIONS 


Water Service 


• 


• 


Phone 6-2552 


PHONE 6-2552 


Res. 6-4432 


Ralph Keckler 


• 
"Send Flowers!" 



Page 30 



Zenas Aplington's house was on Lot 1 in 
Block 21 at the corner of North Franklin and 
Locust, the latter given its name because 
some of Aplington's locust trees stood in the 
middle of the street. 

Aplington moved another frame house 
to the actual northeast corner of Block 2L 
This was Polo's first store. He also built a 
blacksmith shop not far from his home on 
what is now Lot 7, Block 22. This site is just 
west of the old Pearson home now occupied 
by Mr. and Mrs. Mark Conrad. 

When Charles V/. Joiner certified on 
the back of the original town plat that he 
had "laid out and surveyed the within town 
plat, called the Town of Polo," his endorse- 
ment initiated activity. The date was March 
21, 1853. He further certified that the town 
was laid out at the request of Benjamin Pro- 
vost, John Dement and Zenas Aplington, the 
"proprietors of the same," which indicates 
that Mr. Aplington had taken in partners to 
help in promotion of the new town which had 
Buffalo Grove in competition a mile away. 

Whether at Aplington's suggestion or his 
own sense of proportion. Surveyor Joiner 
laid out the main business street of the new 
town to a width of 80 feet, since his employer 
was giving the land and had plenty of it. The 
railroad right of way was 200 feet wide with 
a 50-foot street on each side. Green on the 
west and Jefferson on the east. All other 
streets in the town were laid out to a width 
of 60 feet. 

Plat for the Original Town of Polo was 
filed with the clerk of the circuit court 
March 15, 1853. On the west side of the rail- 
road its southern boundary was Webster 
street, extended west to Division thence 
north on Division to North street, thence east 
to the railroad one block south to Dixon 
street, eastward to Prairie street, and south 
to Webster street, consisting of 17 square 
blocks. 

How rapidly the town grew is shown by 
the dates of the subdivisions added to the 
Original Town. The first one, quite natur- 
ally, was that of Mr. Aplington which was 
surveyed Nov. 23, 1854 and filed Jan. 30. 
1855. He was listed as the "owner and pro- 
prietor." 

Chanceford and L. N. Barber filed their 
subdivision May 20, 1855 and Mrs. Catherine 
R. Chatfield followed with hers Aug. 30, 1855. 
V. B. Webster filed his October 6 and Tho- 
mas Cutts filed the last one of the year on 
Nov. 16, 1855. Other early subdivisions were 
filed by Mr. Aplington for his second, Aug. 
14, 1857 and Samuel Waterbury filed his on 
June 18 the same year. 

Mr. Aplington et al, knowing that new 
towns to thrive must have population, held 
the first public sale of town lots in May of 
1853 but the plat was not acknowledged by 
the owners until February of 1854. It was 
recorded March 15, 1854. 





TEST 

WESTERN WEAR 
Best by Test 



. paddle 

^^-- "^ and 

saddle* 

VU/LCU/lllZGCl Men's & Boys' Sportswear 

DOUBLE-KNEE 

Jeans 

TEST Western Wear 

Winders Clothing Co. 

Annabel Winders Kopp 
Proprietor 



Page 31 




•iws*-; '-:,-,-jKmm--'f^, 



Dingley's Drug Store About 1880 — Dr. L. A. Beard Is The Customer. 



Farm - - Home - - Industrial 

WELL 




DRILLING 

All Work On 
Written Contract 



Reasonable Prices 

Free Estimates 

Your Business will be Appreciated by 

DON HEINS 

POLO, ILL. 
*a Phone 6-3310 If no answer: Ph. 6-3313 



Page 32 



In the meantime, work on the raih-oad 
was commenced in 1852 and by December of 
1853 the contractors had finished their work. 
However, railroad traffic was delayed be- 
cause a bridge at Dixon had not been com- 
pleted and it was a year, or a little more, be- 
fore trains began running. The first train 
crossing took place about January 1, 1855. 

Trains had descended from Freeport to 
Forreston and Polo prior to that date, haul- 
ing in lumber and other commodities. A Mr. 
Bassett said he had shipped lumber from 
Chicago via the Galena & Chicago Union to 
Freeport thence to Forreston in the early 
spring of 1854. 

The coming of the railroad was the sig- 
nal for an outburst of activity in building. 
Harrison Coller built one of the first houses 
in Polo just north of the stone building more 
recently the Typer law office, in 1853. That 
was the signal and the rush was on. 

Zenas Aplington commenced a brick 
building, the first in Polo, on the corner of 
Mason and Franklin in 1853 but did not occu- 
py it completely until 1854. It was about this 
time that the town's first hotel was built. It 
was the Pennsylvania House erected on Lot 
12 Block 14 North Franklin. It was razed in 
1957 showing the scars of two fires. 

Another early hotel was the Haynes 
House built in 1857 by William Haynes on 
the site occupied by the home of Mrs. Wm. 
Forsyth at 203 N. Franklin Avenue. Still 
another was one built by John Jay. All of 
these small houses were operating in the 
spring of 1854, an indication of the rapidity 
with which growth took place. 

"The music of the saw and the hammer," 
said one early writer, "was heard on every 
hand." Population increased so fast during 
the winter of 1854-55 that Lucy A. Bassett, 
Polo's first school teacher, opened classes in 
the Williams building on the north side of 
Mason street on the site of Muench's Shoe 
Store. 

One writer said that 500 houses were 
built in the two years after the town was 
platted. While that may be "chamber of com- 
merce talk," it is certain that the upsurge in 
building of both homes and business build- 
ings was immense as was usual with new 
towns. 

Harrison Sanford erected a two-story ho- 
tel on the southeast corner of Block 21 which 
is the site of the present Marco Polo hotel in 
1855. It was widely known as the Sanford 
House. Later another story was added and a 
new wing built but it wasn't long until the 
structure was considered unsafe. It was then 
razed about 1870 and a new, better Sanford 
House arose on the same site. It was at the 
original Sanford House that Abraham Lin- 
coln and Judge J. D. Campbell breakfasted 
together the day following Lincoln's debate 
with John Wentworth in Oregon, in 1856. 



Siamese Kittens 

FOR SALE 




Seal, Blue 

and 

Chocolate 

Points 



Prize Sire at Stud 

Sweetsiam Cattery 

George and Iris Sweet 



Phone 6-3262 



Polo, 111. 



24-Hour 
Truck Stop 

Mechanic and 
Tire Service 

• 

EXCELLEIST FOOD 

WELL'S 

GULF SERVICE 

Phone 6-9281 



Page 33 




Use Good Gulf Products 

Welcome to Polo ! And welcome to Gulf Service where 
service with a smile is our main asset. You know you're 
using the BEST when you use Gulf. 

Our Best Wishes to everyone on Polo's wonderful 
Centennial Celehration . . . and be sure to visit us! 



A. H. Lord 

6-9232 

BULK AGENT 




Kenneth Brown 

6-9232 

KEN'S GULF 



Our Watchwords . . . Courtesy and Service 



Page 34 



TAPPAN 

Gas and Electric 

# Built-in Ovens 

• Surface Units 

* 

HOTPOINT 

Built-in Kitchen Units 

• 

NAYLON'S 

Electric Service 

Ph. 6-3202 412 N. Congress 


S-ni-o-o-t-h ! Lawton's 

Ice Cream 

In pints, half gallons and 
21/2 gallons for your Freezers! 


SANDWICHES - HOT CHILI 


FOUNTAIN DRINKS 

J(UI)Ui 

POLO DAIRY ISLAND 
119 W. Mason St. 




Thirty-two of the 48 Barclay school chil- 
dren pictured with their teacher, Elsie Liv- 
ingston, about 1895, are still living. They are 
Ernest Smith, John Kilday, Fanny O'Kane, 
Agnes Hartwig, Jessie Quest, Ida Quest, Ol- 
lie Piper, Elmer Shank, Billy Quest, Henry 
Smith, Louis Shank, Walter Quest, Grace 



Kilday, Elmira Kriebel, Margie Shank, Nel- 
lie Herbert, Alva Shank, Harry O'Kane, El- 
mer O'Kane, Mae Kriebel, Ida Shank, Ollie 
O'Kane, Pearle Worden, Mae Quest, John 
Shugars, Will O'Kane, Ella Schryver, Ethel 
Schryver, Jesse Quest, Grace Quest, Mae Her- 
bert and Sykes Worden. 



Page 35 



Red Jacket and Deming 

PUMPS 



Eclipse Lawn Mowers 
PIPE and HARDWARE 



Cap's Plumbing 

Hardware & Repair 

HALDANE 
Polo Ph. 6-2378 Forreston Ph. 85X 



Best Wishes From 

Wayne Dyer 

Your Friendly 

MOBIL DEALER 

Phone 6-9152 




Kelly' Williamson Co. 

Socony-Mobil Distributors 
Main 2077 Freeport, 111. 



Economize On Your Fuel! 

use . . . 

Detrem Gas 

Clothes Drying 
Heating 
Cooking 
Heating Water 
Tractors 
Bottled or Bulk 
For Trucks 

Congratulations On the Centennial 

Detrem Gas Co. 




Phone 6-1182 



R. C. Styczynski, Prop. 



Polo 



Page 36 




Lgr— ' '^^1 



The late Guy Donaldson surveyed this afternoon scene on East Mason from a point in front 
of D. Buck's hardware, with Welch's Shoe Store next door. Notice the mail box, buttons on 
the boy's short pants. Any boy who got just to sit in a car was a hero immediately. 



With four hotels already in business, A 
farmer, Pearson Shoemaker, in 1855 saw op- 
ening for another, one that featured big home 
cooked dinners for hungry seekers after their 
fortunes in the new country. He was still the 
proprietor of his Orient House in 1878 and 
Mrs. Wm. R. Johnson, his granddaughter, 
remembers him; this fact places his opera- 
tion at a much later date. His first Orient 
House may be seen on page 25. 

This first Orient House was done over, 
length added and a bay put on the south side 
but what year is not known. The Orient 
House as seen on page 22 was destroyed by 
fire Dec. 11, 1903, to be replaced by the pres- 
ent brick structure. 

The fire bell was rung and the hose cart 
drawn by one horse with Will Brown in 
charge arrived at the scene and just about 
2 a.m. connections had been made. The oper- 
ation was delayed 15 minutes by the ap- 
proach of an ICRR freight train over which 
tracks the hose was laid. The structure was 
burned to the ground. 

Churches flourished and through the 
generosity of Zenas Aplington each one re- 
ceived a gift to aid in the work. Printing 
presses came; lodges came to draw their 
members closer together, the Masonic in 1855 



and the I.O.O.F. in 1856. Physicians and den- 
tists came on the scene with Dr. W. W. Burns, 
father of the late E. L. "Deacon" Burns and 
Dr. Robert Fisher, the first, in 1853. 

With the burgeoning population folks 
sometimes disagreed and resorted to the law, 
a condition that brought John D. Campbell, 
later county judge, as the first permanent 
lawyer, in 1855. Campbell became famous in 
these parts as the owner of a herd of deer 
for which he seems to be better known today. 
A new town. Our Town, was rising and 
in the years that followed it took its place 
in the business, agricultural and spiritual life 
of northern Illinois as a leader. The vision 
of the Young Turks who beckoned to the 
railway was fast becoming fact. Population 
brought establishment of the Polo "Sentinel", 
the first newspaper in 1856, the year in which 
the ICRR files say "Polo boasted a population 
of 2,500." 

Literally. Polo was a town without a gov- 
ernment but folk generally got along quite 
well together. While this was true they saw 
the need of a village government. The town 
was incorporated by act of the state legisla- 
ture Feb. 16, 1857, from which date Our 
Town exists officially. 

Now being a legal entity the village pro- 



Page 37 




Congratulations 

To the Finest Folks Anywhere 

POLO 



Harold Lenhart 

Manager 

A & P STORE 



TEXACO 

PRODUCTS 

• Fire Chief Gas 

• Sky Chief Gas 

• Havoline Oil 



Rex Carr ♦ . . 
♦ ♦ ♦ Bob Hoover 



Phone 6-0502 



ceeded to activate the new government at 
an election held in the basement of Zenas 
Aplington's store. The date was April 16, 1857 
with the following results: Zenas Aplington, 
J. B. More, Cornelius Woodruff, J. M. Reed, 
James Brand, S. E. Treat and H. N. Murray 
elected as trustees, chosen from among 28 
candidates, for whom 855 votes were cast. 

Election of officers resulted in Mr. Ap- 
lington being elected president and Mr. More 
clerk. Each trustee was required to swear 
that he had never "fought a duel, presented 
or accepted a challenge to fight a duel the 
probable issue of which might have been the 
death of either party," and that he would re- 
frain from any connection with a duel in the 
future! 

The first official act of the board of trus- 
tees was to require a license of all circuses 
and entertainment: circus $10; vocalists $5; 
jugglers $10; paintings and panoramas $10. 
Thus the first village board encouraged cul- 
ture by letting singers come in for $5. The 
town has maintained this early encourage- 
ment of artistic endeavor. 

It was a busy time for everyone, the year 
1857. The village board met seven times dur- 
ing the town's first month of legal existence. 
Among the official acts of those first days 
was a levy of two days of labor for poll tax; 
ordinance affecting the building of sidewalks; 
hogs running loose about town; putting 
'pounded stone' around the town pump ;levy- 
ing fines for assault and battery, drunken- 
ness, gambling and disturbing the peace; 
driving or riding horses, mules or oxen on 
the sidewalks; appointing fire wardens; and 
rental of offices for the village board, among 
many others. Population and business were 
exploding; in the year 1858 all of 55 build- 
ings were erected, mostly for business. 

While Our Town was not "dry behind 
the ears" as a legal entity the village board 
was looking ahead to beautification of the 
streets. On April 19, 1859, an ordinance was 
enacted requiring citizens to plant suitable 
shade or ornamental trees in front of their 
property. The town was a colony of human 
beavers working early and late to construct 
a foundation for themselves and for those 
who should follow, a foundation that would 
last. How well they planned and executed 
their plans is evidenced today in the beauti- 
ful streets of Polo. 

Within four years after completion of 
the railroad in 1855 Polo had two printing 
offices and newspapers, three hotels, nine 
grain dealers, seven dry goods stores, two 
drug and book stores, two hardware stores, 
one melodeon factory, one wind grist mill, 
one steam planing mill, three blacksmith 
shops, two bakeries, fifteen carpenters, four 
shoe shops, three lawyers, two coal yards, one 
wagon factory, one wood turner, three tailors, 
one cooper shop, three harness shops, one 
tin shop, one paint and oil store, two paint- 



Page 38 




Quiet and Restful - ■ White Pines State Park Lodge 

Beautiful Scenery - - Wonderful Food! 



Breakfast 
8-10 a.m. 

LUNCH 
11:30-2:30 

DINNER 
5-7:00 p.m. 



Parties - Lnrg^e Groups 

FOR RESERVATIONS 

Telephone Polo 6-1124 



CLOSED MONDAYS 



White Pines Forest 
State Park Lodge & Restaurant 



JOHN MAXSON, MANAGER 



Mail: Rt. 1, Mt. Morris 



Page 39 



ers, two dentists, four practicing physicians, 
one furniture room and cabinet shop, and 
four lumber yards. 

Business in the early days of our Town 
was not the only segment of the society to 
flourish. Organized free education was only 
a few steps behind Lucy Bassett's classes in 
Williams Hall. Classes were held soon there- 
after in what is now the home of Mrs. Mul- 
brey Mulnix, 317 South Franklin, that of 
Archie Smith, 402 S. Congress, and that of 
Dr. Louise Keator, 112 N. Division, this lat- 
ter Polo's First town hall built by James 
Mosher. 

Polo schools operated under the Buffalo 
Grove district until April 21, 1856, when a 
new district was organized and called Dis- 
trict No. 2. The new district was barely or- 
ganized when it was divided with Mason 
street as the dividing line; that part north of 
Mason was called District No. 1 and that 
south of Mason District No. 9. From April 
1857 until the creation of the Polo School 
District in February 1867 the two districts 
operated separately although there were 
many efforts at changes. 

Our Town was jubilant when news came 
from Springfield that the Polo School Dist- 
rict had been created by the legislature. The 
date was February 14, 1867. This action had 
evidently been anticipated for in two weeks. 



February 28, 1867, plans for a new school 
building were completed and accepted by the 
board, Dr. W. W. Burns, Col. Morton D. 
Swift, and Andrew Hitt, Esq. 

Plans called for the use of blue limestone 
construction. Contracts were authorized im- 
mediately for lumber, stone, and other ma- 
terials. The work was commenced without 
delay. When winter came the new school had 
been completed and occupied. It served well 
for several years but it had imperfections 
which were discovered by the teachers and 
pupils. The ventilation was poor; there were 
no class rooms, and the building was heated 
with stoves. 

As early as 1884 dissatisfaction was build- 
ing up for something better. By 1890 mount- 
ing pressure had become heavy and in 1898 
decision had been reached to move ahead to 
a better plant. The old gave way to the new. 
The 1867 school shown on page 61 was razed 
and a new one built in 1899. On November 20 
teachers and pupils proudly moved into the 
new building which now serves as the grade 
school. 

Another moving day came in 1927 when 
all high school students with their teachers 
marched from the old location to the new 
building on the east side which had just been 
completed. Now another move is imminent 
with the construction of a new senior high 




Home of Henry Samuelson - Polo, 111. 



Constructed by 



]. R* Darrow Co*, Inc* 



TELEPHONE 6-1932 



J. R. Darrow 



Polo, 111. 



Page 40 










I 



Methodist Church 1834 — First in Buffalo Grove, First in Ogle County. 



Our 123rd Year of Service 



Dating back to the year 1834, Polo Method- 
ism may well lay claim to being the foster mo- 
ther of religious activity in this area, since there 
was no preaching from Rock Island to Galena nor 
from the Mississippi eastward for many miles. 

First services were begun in the homes of 
pioneer families and at the tavern of Oliver W. 
Kellogg, a Methodist, ,iust south of the bridge 
over Buffalo Creek at the site recently marked 
as the home of Isaac Chambers, first white set- 
tler in what is now Ogle county. 

Our church was the first in Buffalo Grove 
and in Ogle county, as well, although it was 
not the first in Polo. Services soon were moved 
to the Buffalo Grove school erected in 1836, and 
they continued there until the church, shown on 
this page, was built in 1850. The first class was 
organized March 3, 1835 with seven members, 
George, Anne and Nancy Wilcoxen, Stephen and 
Mary Smith, Oliver W. Kellogg, and Aleitha 
Hughes. 

Polo grew so rapidly that Methodist services 



began here Sunday afternoons in 1857. In 1860 
this congregation had grown so much that a 
new church enterprise was undertaken. The 
site of the present church was acquired in 1860 
in which year services were begun in a tempo- 
rary structure where the parsonage now stands. 
The new building was completed and dedicated 
in 1862. 

The present church was erected in 1898 after 
several years of discussion of ways to eliminate 
the crowded conditions. It's cost was $15,000. 
The dedicatory services were held January 29, 
1899. When the services opened there was a 
deficit of $3,675 which amount was in the hands 
of the trustees before the dedication service 
ended. The parsonage was built in 1900 at a 
cost of $3,800. 

This is an account of the Methodist church 
as a religious organization. The history of its 
ministrations to those who have been its members 
from time to time during the past 123 years 
still speaks forth in an active church. 



THE METHODIST CHURCH 



Ben F. White, Minister 



Page 41 



Get more than you bargained for! 




NYLON-REINFORCED NECK cant sag' 
Hanes is America's favorite T-shirl 
—size-last, highly absorbent, and 
has a new whitei-than-while finish. 
Small, medium, large. Still 



NYLON-REINFORCED STRAPS 

make this Hanes undershirt wear 
longer, yet you pay no more! Highly 
absorbent combed cotton. Full-cut 
to stay tucked in. New whiter-than- 
white finish. 34-46. 




NYLON REINFORCED supporting 
seams make Hanes Fig Leaf briefs a 
bigger buy than ever' Double panel 
seaf Knit from sot! absorbent cotton 
with new whiter than white finish 
Heatresistant elastic in waistband and 
leg openings. 28-44 



AND DID YOU EVER HEAR 

of shorts with Nylon reinforced 
fly and a seamless seat ' Hanes Giwies 
are Sanforized and bias cut to 
g I V e in the stretches 2 styles in 
solid white or stripes. 28-44. 



To get more than you bargained for 
in underwear, the name's 



HANES 



Winders Clothing Co. 

Annabel Winders Kopp 

Owner 



school to be ready this fall. A new grade 
school is also under construction. 

Limited space prevents the documenta- 
tion of public improvements such as paving, 
electric light plants and others. The Burling- 
ton railroad came through in 1886 giving the 
town added freight and passenger service. By 
1921 passenger service was at its peak. M. W. 
Davis & Sons printed an R. R. timetable for 
their purebred Poland China Sale, Feb. 28, 
1921, which showed Polo then had 13 pas- 
senger stops daily, six on the ICRR and sev- 
en on the "Q." 

When one comes to the end of a story 
he only then appeciates the many things that 
should have had mention. And so it is with 
this brief account of Our Family Tree. Our 
Town is proud of its past, its founders, as well 
as those who have conserved along the way 
to the end of the First Hundred Years and 
the beginning of the Second Century. The 
pioneers long ago finished their work; the 
time of growing found others ready to put 
their minds to the task of building upon what 
had been handed down to them. Now it will 
soon fall to younger hearts and hands to take 
over, to conserve and to forge ahead with ac- 
tions necessary for building the sort of a com- 
munity, state and nation that will add most 
to their happiness and well being and to that 
of future generations that one day will take 
over from them. 



Bees Precede White Man 

An early visitor to the Rock River coun- 
try, Hon. J. Gillespie, observed that "it is a 
fact that the honeybee is just in advance of 
the white population in the settlement of a 
new country, and its first appearance is a 
cause of great anxiety to the Indian." 

In describing his approach to the Rock 
River this writer said "the only indications 
we found that human beings had been there 
before us were where the Indians had cut 
off the branches of the trees in which the 
honey-bees had made their hives. 

"The groves seemed to have been alive 
with them judging from the number of trees 
from which they had been dislodged. The In- 
dians would not cut down the trees but 
would climb up and cut off the limb that 
contained the honey, or cut into the side of 
the tree where the hive was in the trunk. 

"I have observed that for a few years af- 
ter the honey-bee makes its first appearance 
it increases with wonderful rapidity and af- 
ter some ten or fifteen years begins to de- 
cline. 

"They had been but a few years in the 
country between the Illinois and Rock Riv- 
ers when I passed through. They had not yet 
arrived in the mining country until 1826 or 
1827." 



Page 42 




Polo Street Scene From Post Office West In The 1880s 



Buyers of 
Top Quality 


Melvin Haak 

AUCTIONEER 


EGGS 


Farm Sales 


and 






Real Estate 


LIVE 


Furniture 


POULTRY 


Private Sales 


Polo Produce 

Phone 6-4822 


Qualified and Experienced 

PHONE Polo 6-2188 



Page 43 




Seen here are the seventh and eighth graders 
of 1885, models of style and erudition. The three 
boys sitting on the ground, left to right: Hugh Grif- 
fin, Wm. Frank Attley, Lawson Scott. First row, 
girls: Ella (Yeakel) Stahler, Jessie (Cairnes) Shoe- 
bottom, Anna (Lawrence) McQuaid, Madge (Allen) 
Cook, Mae (Kline) Smith, Hattie (Strock) Schry- 
ver, Nora (Miller) Wasser, Anna (Bain) Attley, 
Anna Price, Florence Hammer, Cora Cunningham, 
Nellie Burbank, Ellen (Hays) Woolsey, Bessie 
Snook, Julia Vaughn, Mabel Danielson. At right. 



Miss Anna Steele, teacher. Third row: Imogene 
Anderson, Cora Hibarger, Lucy Williams, Ann Gor- 
don, Esther Waterbury, Anna Williams, Jessie 
(Schryver) Milne, Minnie Cornelius. Fourth row: 
Monnie Metz, Charlie Clark, George Bracken, Frank 
Niman, Frank Brubaker, Herman Smith, Pearlie 
Herrick, John O'Connor. Will St. John, George Ni- 
man. Back row: George Good, Wayland Treat, Frank 
Cunningham, Charlie Price, Sam Adams, Will or 
Kimble Hobbs, Elmer Antrim, Harvey Antrim, 
William (Whiskers) Dew. 



General 


BUILDING 


Auto Repairs 


MAIERIALS 

COAL 


• 


* 


Overhauls - Tune Ups 


Woosung Lumber Co. 


• 


Woosung, 111. 


Powell Motors 


• 

PHONE POLO 6-1882 


John Powell 


Dixon 2-5701 


Phone 6-2892 Polo 


Need Groceries? Get them at our Store. 



Page 44 




Best Wishes to Polo on 
Its Second 100 Years 



We pause at this Centennial time to pay honor 
to the men who pioneered at Buffalo Grove and 
those who planned and caused to be surveyed the 
Original Town of Polo. May we do as well in the Sec- 
ond Hundred Years as they did in the first. 

Our Company as an important part of Polo hopes 
to play its full part in the continued development of 
Our Town. 



ISlorthwestern Telephone Co. 



Page 45 




This Polo Cornet Band was going strong in the early 1880s. No. 8 was John Bowers, No. 8 
Rene Smith, No. 12 Henry Miller, No. 13 W. F. Clothier, from left to right. The bandwagon 
was a honey. These were the Golden Days of band music . . . when bandsmen were heroes. 




HARRY A. FOLK 



Moorman^s 

1885 to 1957 
The Best in Feeds 

Harry A. Folk 

Your FEED Dealer for 17 Years 
Phone 6-3452 Polo, 111. 



QUALITY 
CLOTHES 

For Men and Boys— at 
the right prices! Also— 



The World's Best 
Overall by 



OSH|g)SH 



WORK WEAR 



l^^i 



^ 



ED TAYLOR 

Men's and Boys' Wear 
Phone 6-2102 



Page 46 




Page 47 






Pioneer traffic in the 1830s streamed over 
this now lonely but beautiful stone arch 
bridge on the Peoria-Galena State Road at 
Chambers Grove just beyond Brookville. The 
cemetery where Isaac and Ann Lee Cham- 
bers rest is directly through the arch and 
to the right in the woods. David Hoffhine, 
Charles Franks and others rest there. First 



person to be buried in the cemetery was an 
unknown mother who died in childbirth after 
she had been taken in as her time approached, 
by Mrs. Chambers. This section of the road 
"now belongs with the ages." Authorities 
seem to agree that Lincoln camped near this 
bridge in 1832 on his way to Galena and a- 
gain on the return march. 



WELDING 

and 

REPAIRS 

• 

BLACKSMITHING 

• 

DALE BECK 

Phone 6-1345 



JANNEY 

Best Points & Varnishes 



All-Kote — One Coat Flat Paint. 
Magic-Flo — Quick Drying Enamel. 
Hi-Gloss & Semi-Gloss Wall Enamel 
Tripl-Tuff Floor Finishes. 
Master-Made House Paint. 



'Where to Buy It 



f" 



WESTERN AUTO 
ASSOCIATE STORE 



122 W. Mason 



Phone 6-4642 



Page 48 





1950 ^ Anniversary ^ 195 7 

Polo's 100th - - ^ Our 7th 

Those Polo leaders of a century ago had dreams of 
the future and they made them come true, as our 
Centennial so vividly shows. Our own plans for the 
future now in progress on our Seventh Anniversary 
will add materially to our ability to give employ- 
ment to more people. 

In our First Seven years we have tried to be a 
real asset to our community. Our hope for the future 
is to become an even greater asset. 

Our Best Wishes to Polo as it begins its Second 
Century. 

Central Stamping & Mfg. Co. 

900 SOUTH DIVISION STREET - POLO, ILLINOIS 




Page 48-A 



Centennial Committees 



Executive — Douglas White, J. Anthony Smith, Irma O'Kane, Doris Weaver, John Phalen 
Directors — John Phalen, president; Douglas White, Evan Reck, Grant Riggs Jr., Annabel McGrath, 
Everett Webster, Mrs. Richard Schell, Rev. Ira Wilson, C. R. Clothier, Nathan Mount, Eddie Ports, 
Evangeline H. Donaldson, E. H. Cassens, J. Anthony Smith, Mrs. Helen Bentley, Harry A. Wolf, 
Axel Olsen, Ross W. Hostetter, John Coffman, Charles Joiner, Miss Delia Miller, Miss Pearle Join- 
er. John Heckman, Mrs. Annabel Winders Kopp. J. J. Ports, George Strickler (1876-1956). 
Fireworks — Lester Weaver Underwriting— Chas. J. Wolf Decorations — E. J. Diehl 



REVENUE DIVISION 
James Schryver 

Novelties: John Merry, Russell Scholl, Mrs. 
Annabel Kopp: Concessions: Clyde Powell, Elwyn 
Wolf, Robert Hoak, Mildred Hoak; Centennial 
Celebration Ball; Clyde Powell, Helen Wolf, Ralph 
Davis, Virginia Galor, Roberta Powell, Gene Kleck- 
ler, Frances Dempsey, Elwyn Wolf, Margaret Nigh- 
swonger, Virgil Waterbury. 

PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 
John Phalen 

Press Release: Kathryn Keagy: Radio and TV: 
Arthur Eichholz; Distribution: Harry Folk, Ken 
Brown; Speaker; Chas. Wolf, Rev. Wilson, John 
Phalen. 

HOSPITALITY DIVISION 
Isabelle Schell 

Dignitaries: Isabelle Schell; Housing: Mrs. 
Richard Folk, Mrs. Willard Hogge; Pioneer Recogni- 
tion: Irma O'Kane. 



SPECTACLE TICKET DIVISION 
Ross Hostetter 

Tickets: Martin Schryver, Janet Eichholz, Jean 
Schryver, AUie Schryver; Queen Contest: John 
Frayser, Buffalo Belles; Cashier and Gates: Willis 
Pittenger, Albert Iske, Lee Hummel, Don Doyle, 
John Seise. 

BROTHERS OF THE BRUSH 

Chapter Head Brother Sponsor 

Green Ties, Chuck Dempewolf, Bob's Barber Shop 
Roto-Brush, Eddie Ports, Rotary Club 

3-B Boys, Steve Stanich Steve's Tavern 

Growlers, Bob Duncan, Lions Club 

Yellow Vests, Harvey Dykema Lions Club 

Casey Jones. Russell Scholl Methodist Church 
Black Ties, Fay Barnhart, Christian Church 
Chain Gang, Don Blanchard. Al's Tavern 

Hoyle's Bearded Fugitives, Bill Ritenour, Cozy Cafe 
Balls O' Fire. Harold Brooks, Polo Fire Department 
"Spunge" Heads, Bob Hoffman, VFW 

Order of the Matted Marcos, Ronnie Barnes, Bud's 

Barber Shop 










Those of the oldest living generations of 
Polo recall having heard of "The Wigwam," 
pictured above, but not one could remember 
where it stood. It was built during the Civil 
War on the site now occupied by Eddie Tyne's 
Station and the Jacob Ramp home on North 



Division. It appears to have been of pole con- 
struction, open at the sides and partially at 
the ends, used for community purposes, per- 
haps a local fair. The original is the property 
of the Illinois State Historical Library which 
loaned it for the Centennial Program. 



48-B 




Since 1865 the Tri-County Press has 
had only four editors, John W. Clinton, 
1865-1901, A. T. Cowan, 1901-1913, C. H. 
Hemingway, 1913-1926, and G. C. Terry, 
1926-19??. 

Of these, two served as president of 
the Illinois Press Association. They were 
Mr. Clinton and the present publisher, 
the former in 1883, the latter in 1940. 
However, Mr. Cowan and Mr. Heming- 
way might well have served in that 
capacity for both were highly qualified. 

The Centennial month of June is also 
the Centennial of the Tri-County Press, 
which traces its lineage from 1857 as 
follows: 

POLO TRANSCRIPT 
1857-1858 

POLO ADVERTISER 
1858-1865 

OGLE COUNTY PRESS 
1865-1901 

TRI-COUNTY PRESS 
1901-???? 



SPECTACLE DIVISION 
Everett Webster 

.Scenario: Fan Schryver, Doris Weaver, Cath- 
erine Phalen; Cast Committee: Mrs. Dan Fierheller 
Camilla Jones, Mrs. Evan Reck, Mrs. Ralph Ports- 
Properties: Russell Poole, Mrs. Buell Brodie Mr' 
Buell Brodie, Mrs. Robert Lund, Mr. Robert Lund- 
Construction: Don Doyle. Rich Naylon. Ralph Ports- 
Spectacle Music: Rodger Troxel, Easter Cantata 
numbers; Costumes and Make-Up: Daisy Belles of 
the P. E. O.— Helen Bcntley, Norma Boyes Elva 
Burman, Marguerite Coffey, Carol Coffman. Mary 
Copenhaver, Esther Davies. Ina Hostetter, Florence 
Joiner, Jeanette Joiner, Zella Joiner, Elizabeth Ann 
Kaufman, Helen McDaniel, Aileen McGrath, Anna- 
bel McGrath, Milbrey Mulni.x, Vera Ocker, Clara 
Cottam,. Catherine Phalen, Grovene Pittenger, Flo- 
rence Rowland, Marjorie Stuff, Fannie Schryver, 
Nelle Seise, Romano Terry. 



MISCELLANEOUS COMMITTEES 

Merchants' Promotion: B. A. Muench; Parades: 
Grant Riggs, Carl Smith, Leonard Eykamp, Vernon 
Volz. Max Snook, John Brockwell; Music Comm : 
Ned Parrett; Sunday, Religious Day: Ira Wilson. 
Glen Isley, La Verne Binkley, Mrs. Stanley Web- 
ster, Mrs. Herbert Hayes; Monday, Old Timer's 
Day: Elery Shank. John Brindle, Jake Ramp. E\-- 
erett Webster; Tuesday, Youth Day; Mrs. Paul 
Fossler, Mrs, Clara Davis, M. R. Van Cleave, Doris 
Powell, Albert Iske, Mark Porter; Wednesday. 
Ladies Day: Iris Sweet and Sisters of the Swish; 
Thursday, Agriculture Day: John Coffman, Bob 
Duncan, Harold Brooks, Orlo Wehmeyer, Russell 
Poole, Ralph Stuff, Fred Krum, Orville Rucker; 
Friday, Men's Day: Rich Naylon and Brothers of 
the Brush; Saturday, Military Day: Grant Riggs. 
Carl Smith, Leonard Eykamp, Vernon Volz, Max 
Snook, John Brockwell; Sunday, Clean-Up Day: 
Everyone welcome to help. 



SISTERS OF THE SWISH 

Chapter President Sponsor 

Aplington Peaches, Mrs. Russell Haak 
Belle Stars, Mrs. Ben Sanford, Eastern Star 
Belles Sec. 43', Mrs. Isabelle Schell, Eve. Worn. Club 
Black Bandettes, Mrs. John Gasmund 
Buffalo Belles, Helen Wolf 

Buttons, Bustles and Bows, Maria Powell, H. S. Jrs 
Century Lites, Mrs. William Johnson, Century Club 
Colonial Sweets, Mrs. W. T. Graham, Candy Project 
Covered Wagon Cuties, Gloria Scholl, H. S. Soph 
Daisy Belles, Annabel McGrath, P. E. O. 

Daughters of Pioneers, Mrs. John Powell 
Farmerettes, Mrs. Oscar Wragg, Pine Creek 
Friendly Swishers, Mrs. R. O. Blough, Church of Br 
Guyer Girls, Methodist Church 

Harvey Girls, Lola Brantner, Methodist Church 
Harvey Girls No. 2, Marjorie Bomberger. Meth. Ch 
Log Cabin Ladies. Mrs. Menno Maas, Church of Br 
Marco Belles, Mrs. Win Hurdle 

Marionettes, Mrs. Don Doyle, St. Mary's Church 
Old Town Gals, Janet Toms Wicklum. Buffalo Gr. 
Parmalee Girls, Dorothy Smith, Grade Sch. Teach. 
Prairie Flowers. Karen Lingg, H. S. Freshmen 
Pioneer Homebuilders. .Mrs. Paul Schmidt, C. of Br 
Prairie Janes, Mrs. Fred Graehling 
Pres. Pioneers, Irma O'Kane 

Rebekahettes, Mrs. Walter Hendrix, Rebekah's 
Ruffle-Ettes, Marlene Powell, H. S. Seniors 
Southern Belles. Bernice Horton 
Sun Bonnet Sue's, Mrs. Joyce Kavanaugh 
Swanky Belles, Thelma Schwenk, Schwenk's Store 
Swish Squaws, Martha Olson. Am. Legion Aux 
Tourist Belles, Grovene Pittenger, Would-Be Tour- 
Vet Ettes, Mrs. Wm. Palmer, V. F. W. Aux 
Wesleyettes, Mrs. Nathan Mount, Methodist Church 



48-C 



The Citizens of Polo Community Proudly Present The Dramatic 

Historical Panorama ^^Our Century^^ 

A JOHN B. ROGERS PRODUCTION 
James T. Egbert, Producer-Director 

NARRATORS: Mrs. Dan Fierheller, Mrs. Evan Rsck, Mrs. Ben Sanford. Jr., Mrs. Ned Parrett, John 
Phalen, Lee Hummel, Dan Fierheller, Everett Webster. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES WITH CAST LISTINGS AND SPONSOR CREDITS 

Produced in conjunction with 

THE POLO COMMUNITY CENTENNIAL ASSOCIATION 



PROLOGUE 

A fanfare of golden trumpets herald the arrival of 
our Centennial Queen "MISS POLO", preceded by 
her Royal Court of Honor, with the Princesses, 
States to Columbia, Sailorettes, Girl Scouts and 
Boy Scouts, paying homage to their Sovereign . . . 
TRUMPETERS 

Sponsored by: Polo Evening Woman's Club 
Carol Naylon, Sue Ellen Ketner, Linda Hogge, 
Eleanor Iske, Susan Schell, Sharon Garman. 
SAILORETTES 
Sponsored by: Civic League 

Marjorie Klock, Juanita Sweet, Mary Ann Barnes, 
Mary Kay Sarber, Shirley Cross, Dace Treknais, 
Irene Gumn, Linda Andrews, Jackie McKean, Judy 
Hoffman, Brenda Ford, Rosalie Boward, Linda Man- 
cilia, Donna Lohman, Linda Temple, Patsy Man- 
cilia. 

COLOR GUARDS 

Sponsored by: Veterans of Foreign Wars, Post 8455 
Paul Fouke, Bob Hoffman, Junior Lawton, Paul 
Brenner. Stan Hutchison, Hallie Wiens, George 
Shank, Robert Fouke, VFW Auxiliary Marching Un. 
STATES TO COLUMBIA 
Sponsored by: Prairie Flowers 

Kay White. Diane Dickerson. Linda Hopkins, San- 
dra" Sheeley, Sharon Garden. Miriam Wilson. Arlene 
Carr, Karen Miller, Karen Lingg, Ruta Treknais. 
BOY SCOUTS 
Sponsored by: Rotary Club. 

Bill Barnes. Mike Schnierla, Rickie Schnierla, Gary 
Van Cleave, Norman Carroll, David Wilson, George 
Poffenberger, Bobbie Smith, Tommie Poole, Dick 
Tidwell. 
CUB SCOUTS 
Sponsored by: Cub Scouts of Polo, Cub Pack 337, 

Dens 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. 
Roger Lee Gunder. Steve Gunder, Wayne Brooks, 
David Clem, Alvin Ramp, Randy Wagner, Richard 
Bellows, Tommy Smith, Roger Garrison, Robert 
Fry, Lynn Snook, Goby Kaufman, Ronnie Parrett, 
Deryl Donaldson, Bruce Tidwell. Lynn Sarber, 
Kent Prison, Robert Pace, Ronald Carroll, Martin 
Taylor. Tommy Hogge. Clarence Turek, Joel An- 
drews, Micky Scholl, Jimmy Wikoff, Dean Gunder. 
GIRL SCOUTS 

Sponsored by: Girl Scouts of Polo, Troops 101, 51, 52. 
Shirley Powell, Cheryl Reim, Frances Mancilla, 
Karen Meyers, Kay Johnson, Charlene Hawn. Ca- 
milla Sarber, Shirley Pritchard, Sharon Mount, 
Karen Aabram. Diane Duncan, Cheryl Eager. Gor- 
gena Lou Grace. Marilyn Hammer, Kay Kuehl, 
Stephanie Phalen, Gail Shadewaldt, Sandra Tolbert, 
Lynn Typer, Patty Smith, JoAnn Sweet, Georgia 
Van Oosten, Diana Porter, Doris Shank, Sandra 
Hall, Sheila Carlson. Sharon Frey, Diana Hardy, 
Nancy McGuire, Margaret Kilday. Sharon Ports, 



Kathy Chriss, Lillian Engle, Janet Hamel, Gail Poff- 
enberger, Lucretia Schryver, Margaret Wales, San- 
dra White, Beverly Gaul, Jane Bushman, Martha 
Hurdle, Barbara Millard. Patty Powell, Marcia Rid- 
dle, Rosemary Wilson, Carolyn Wolf, Neita Webster, 
Cheryel Sanford, Pamela Ritenour, Laurel Clothier, 
Debbie Dykema, Jane Gasmund. Joann Gasmund, 
Elaine Jecklin, Diana Kemnetz, Pamela Raleigh. 

EPISODE TWO 
"This Is The Polo Story" 

This is the American Story . . . and the story of 
Polo Community ... it is an epic of a tidal wave 
of freedom loving men and women sweeping on to 
a new world rich with natural resources beyond the 
dreams of the ages. With dauntless courage they 
dared the unknown; with flashing axe they widened 
its trails and cleared its great expanses; with un- 
ceasing determination they built a new era in civ- 
ilization and built our great Community of Polo. 
PIONEER FAMILY 
Mr. and Mrs. Russell Poole and family. 

EPISODE THREE 
"The Men of Destiny" 

For countless Moons, the Red Men have lived in 
their tepee-studded villages, criss-croSsed by the 
hunting paths which follow the Rock River. Here, 
on the green banks of the moving stre&m ths Win- 
nebagoes, the Sacs and Foxes fish, then roam 
through the prairie seeking wild game, while the 
women tend to the growing maize . . . Then into 
their primitive atmosphere there comes a new and 
strange pale-faced White Man. Thus we observe 
the Red Man with his living soon to change. 
WINNEBAGO CHIEF: John Frayser, or Rich Folk. 
Sponsored by: Civic League. 
ILLINI CHIEF: Russell Jones. 
Sponsored by: Civic League. 
INDIAN BRAVES 

Sponsored by Civic League and Aplington Peaches 
Gene McKean. Bob Gaul, Pat Ruble, Billy Brooks, 
Stephen Parrett, William Coffman, Justin Ramp, 
Rich Paul, Bob Paul, James Hackett, Bruce Blum, 
Kenny Eichholz. 
INDIAN SQUAWS 

Sponsored by: Be Better Friends, Halcyon Club, 
Wednesday Club, American Legion Auxiliary. 
Ina Reed, Doris Blough. Mary Death, Fern Graeh- 
ling, Verna Stengel, Hazel Coffman, Marjorie Stuff, 
Betty Swallow, Linda Laane, Carol Davidson, Carol 
Coffman, Ida M. Trieschmann, Helen Swanson. 
INDIAN GIRLS 

Sponsored by: American Legion Auxiliary. 
Jane Ann Olson, Patty Powell, Kirsten Powell, 
Debbie Reed, Jean Sweet, Nancy Olsen, Charlene 
Reed. 



48-D 



INDIAN BOYS 

Sponsored by: American Legion Auxiliary. 

Danny Olson, Curtis Olson, Denny Olsen, Kim Ol- 

sen, David Sweet, Rick Schnierla, Mike Schnierla. 

INDIAN MAIDENS 

Sponsored by: Marionettes and American Legion 

Auxiliary. 
Martha Olson, Maxine Olsen, Louise Rucker, Au- 
drey McPherson, Arlene Weaver, Bess Reed, Inge- 
bord Olsen, Iris Sweet, Sally Sweet, Ruth Sweet, 
Doris Powell, Betty Perrin, Jean Smith, Irene Beck- 
enbaugh, Elaine Prey, Mary Kilday, Ruth Clem, 
Mary Ann Hackett, Sharon Smith, Virginia Powell, 
Ruth Drake, Jean Pards, Carolyn Stoner, Karen 
Joiner, Carolyn Cook, Cheryl Clark, Sharon Wilson. 
SOLOIST: Randi Joiner 

EPISODE FOUR 

"Unto This Land" 

Westward Ho, The Wagons! 

The American emigrant now appeared on the scene, 
hauling in his rude covered wagon the elements of 
Nineteenth Century Progress. We see a typical cov- 
ered wagon train planning to "rest a bit and stretch 
a mite!" In each wagon going west were various 
plans and ambitions . . . some of them hopes and 
a few of them still dreams, many religions and ten 
times as many prayers. 

Isaac Chambers welcomes the band of pioneers . . . 
and news from the East . . . many things happen in 
a day of a wagon train going West. A traveling trap- 
per appears on the scene, tunes up his fiddle and the 
pioneer settlers engage in a lively square dance 
which "kinda top off the day's labors." 
MR. & l^RS. ISAAC CHAMBERS: 

Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Clothier. 
GRANNY BROWN; Mrs. Irma O'Kane 
TRAVELING FIDDLER: Lester Schick 
PIONEER MEN 

Sponsored by: Historical Society. 
Bob Pollock (wagon leader), E. J. Diehl, (wagon 
leader), Russell Poole (new father), Dan Fierheller, 
Ross Hostetter, Ed Reck. Evan Reck, Preston Beck- 
enbaugh, Leslie Scott, Harry Folk. 
PIONEER BOYS 

Johnnie Poole, David Poole, Duane Rubendahl, 
David Wilson. 
PIONEER GIRLS 

Suzanne Poole, Debbi Reed, Jean Van Cleave, Helga 
Schwab, and Susan Reck. 
PIONEER WOMEN 

Camilla Jones, Hazel Franks, Irma Reed, Margaret 
Mades, Neva Baker, Katherine Phalen, Irma O'- 
Kane, Pearle Joiner, Mrs. Roy Riggs, Mrs. Elmer 
Weaver, Mrs. Harry Folk, Mrs. C. R Clothier, Mrs. 
Lydia Clem, Marjorie Wilson, Verna Dentler, Kath- 
leen Samuels, Pearl Buchanan, Thirl Hurless, La- 
Donne Hendrix, Fern Keenan, Dorothy Webster, 
Norma Poole, Dorothy Bowers, Eva Johnson, Nelle 
Coffey, Ellen Stenmark, Ida Trieschmann. 
Sponsored by: Historical Society, Rebekahettes. 
SQUARE DANCERS 

Sponsored by: Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Ports. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Joynt, Mr. and Mrs Max Pope, 
Mr. and Mrs. Kelley Pope, Mr. and Mrs. James 
Imel, Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Binkley, Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Gipe, Mr. and Mrs. Don Lawton, Mr. and 
Mrs. Russell Burnell, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Schell, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Don 
Doyle, Mr. and Mrs Ralph Ports, Mr. and Mrs. 
Garland Grace, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Powell, Elwin 
Wolf, Mr. and Mrs. William Palmer, Miss Shirley 
Moeller, Miss Gloria Scholl, Miss Sandra Sheely, 
Miss Linda Nevenhoven, Eddie Pope, Jack Bott, 
Ricky Pope, Marvin Binkley, Leroy Nicodemus, 
Larry Kilday, Robert Gaul, Ronald Ruble, Miss 
Joyce Hoffman, Miss Evelyn Ruble, Miss Marlene 
Weegens, Miss Dorothy Lawton, Mr. and Mrs. Glen 
Sheely, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Nevenhoven, Mr. and 
Mrs. Kenneth Hayes, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kane, 



Mr. and Mrs. John Gasmund, Mr. and Mrs. Barney 
Blum, Mr. and Mrs. Junior Wiens, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jacob Jecklin, Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur A. Johnson, 
Mr. and Mrs John Holiday Sr., Miss Louanne Ru- 
dahl, Mr. Brandt Johnson. Miss Kay Middleton, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Myers, Mr. and Mrs. Roy 
Brockmeier, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Hageman, Mr. 
and Mrs. Harleck Cook, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Cook, 
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Ackerman, Mr. and Mrs. William Kampen, Mr. and 
Mrs. Laurence Rosentiel, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
Sanders, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Hilbert, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ross Zimmerman, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Nott, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Hendren, Mr. and Mrs. Chester 
Raberg, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mellnick, Mr. and 
Mrs Ernest Rademaker, Mr. and Mrs. John Baum- 
gartner, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bocker, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lyle Deuth, Mr. and Mrs. Jess Pierce, John Holi- 
day, Jr. 

EPISODE FIVE 
"The Seventh Day" 

When the pioneers came to this land they brought 
not only their beliefs in Democracy, freedom of op- 
portunity, but they brought with them their beliefs 
in God and the Freedom of Worship. The earliest 
public worship of which history leaves an account 
was conducted by the Methodists in 1834, in a log 
house in Buffalo Township. In 1840, the First Bap- 
tist church of Buffalo Grove was organized. Those 
of the Catholic Faith first attended Mass in 1854, in 
the homes of parishioners and later these people 
were the first to erect a church in the City of Polo 
(1856). 

THE .FIRST CATHOLIC CHURCH: 
Sponsored by: Marionettes. 
MISSIONARY PRIEST: John Long. 
ALTAR BOYS: Ronald Carroll, Le Roy Long. 
FAMILY: 

Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy Long, Miss Mary Long, Gary 
Long, Norman Carroll, Diane Carroll, Donna Carroll 
FIRST PROTESTANT CHURCH: 
Sponsored by: Marionettes. 
JAMES McKEAN, ORGANIZER: Ed Reck. 
GEORGE WILCOXEN: Harry Folk 
METHODIST FAMILY: Mr. and Mrs. Evan Reck. 
SUSAN AND HER PLAYMATES: Jean Van Cleave 
and Helga Schwab. 
THE FIRST CONGREGATION: 
Sponsored by: Presbyterian Pioneers, Historical 

Society and Log Cabin Ladies. 
MINISTERS: William Dew and Clarence Stull. 
Mr. and Mrs. Elery Shank, Mrs. John Brindle, Mr. 
and Mrs. Alpha Bellows, Mr. and Mrs. Everett 
Webster, Mr, and Mrs. Clarence Stull, Mr. and Mrs. 
Menno Maas, Mrs. Arthur Swanson, Miss Betty 
Swanson, Mrs. Walter Maxey, Miss Pearle Joiner, 
Mrs. Arthur Obendorf, Mrs. Camilla Jones, Mrs. 
Irma O'Kane, Walter Maxey, Miles Rogers, Elmer 
Reed, John Coffman, Ray Hedrick, Bob Pollock, 
E. J. Diehl, Russell Poole, Ross Hostetter, Ed Reck, 
Preston Beckenbaugh. Leslie Scott, John Poole, 
David Poole, Dwane Rubendahl, David Wilson, 
Suzanne Poole, Debbi Reed, Hazel Franks, Irma 
Reed, Margaret Mades, Neva Baker, Catherine Pha- 
len, Mrs. Roy Riggs, Mrs. Elmer Weaver, Mrs. 
Harry Folk, Mrs. C. R. Clothier, Mrs. Lydia Clem, 
Mrs. Marjorie Wilson, Verna Dentler, Kathleen 
Samuels, Pearl Buchanan, Thirl Hurless, LaDonne 
Hendrix. 

EPISODE SIX 
"The Dawn Of Education" 

Early in the winter of 1834, Simon Fellows organ- 
ized a small subscription school and classes were 
held in the home of O. W. Kellogg . . . The First 
Schoolhouse was a frame building built in 1836- 
1837. It served the community as a combined school 



48-E 



house and chuixh. It is still standing today. Simon 
Fellows was the first school master . . . his salary 
was $76.29 ... for the YEAR! Let's look in on 
a typical school of yesteryear . . . 
SCHOOLMASTER: Mark Porter. 
SCHOOL CHILDREN 
Sponsored by: Civic League. 

Stephanie Phalen, Diane Porter, Gina Grace, Diana 
Hardy, Curt Porter. Jonathan Wilson, Terry Grace, 
James Schryver, Jr.. Wayne Brooks, Kathy Jobst, 
Cheryl White. 

EPISODE SEVEN 
"The Coining of The Ironhorse" 

One of the greatest factors contributing to the steady 
growth of Polo was the building of the Illinois 
Central Railroad through Ogle County. Construc- 
tion of the railroad was begun as early as 1837, but 
due to financial difficulty, work was later aban- 
doned and lay idle for some time, and it was not 
until 1852, after many delays that the contracts 
were awarded, work commenced. The road was built 
to completion through Ogle County in 1853. 
OLD FASHIONED PEOPLE 
Sponsored by Historical Society, Rebekahettes and 

Log Cabin Ladies. 
Mr. and Mrs. Elery Shank. Mrs. John Brindle, Mr. 
and Mrs. Alpha Bellows, Mr. and Mrs. Everett 
Webster, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence StuU, Mr. and 
Mrs. Menno Maas, La Donne Hendrix, Thirl Hurless, 
Pearl Buchanan, Kathleen Samuels, Verna Dent- 
ler, Marjorie Wilson. 
GUITAR PLAYER 
Larry Knie; song title, "The Men of '29." 

EPISODE EIGHT 
"The Famous Visitor" 

One of the most important events in Polo's history, 
past or present, was the memorable visit of Abra- 
ham Lincoln ... It was in August of 1856, that 
"The Railsplitter," scheduled to make a speech in 
Oregon, was invited by and accepted the invitation 
of Zenas Aplington to be a guest in his home. 
ABRAHAM LINCOLN 
Edgar Murney, Jr. (winner of Abraham Lincoln 

contest). 
ZENAS APLINGTON: Ross Hostetter 
People From Previous scene as TOWNSPEOPLE. 

EPISODE NINE 
"Our City Is Born" 

The year, 1857 , . . The coming of the railroad, 
and the by-passing of Buffalo Grove in 1853, spelled 
doom to the small community, and an increased 
population for Polo; for in addition to the people 
from "Old Town," the population of Polo was in- 
creased by others attracted to the area by the ad- 
vantage ot its location ... so it was in the year of 
1857 that Polo was legally born! 
CITY FATHERS 
Sponsored by: Polo Rotary Club. 
Axel Olsen, Howard Webster, Ross Hostetter, John 
Coffman, George Linker, L. E. Raley. 
TOWNSPEOPLE: People from previous episode. 

EPISODE TEN 
"The Volume in Black" 

With outbreak of the Civil War the progress of 
Polo was checked as many young men marched off 
to the defense of the Union. Hundreds of young 
men volunteered in answer to the call of troops 
by Zenas Aplington, now a member of the State 
Senate. Shiloh . . . Antietam . . . Gettysburg! A 
half million dead. Then the was was over, but of 
the enlisted men credited to Polo, less than one-half 
returned. Major Aplington of the Seventh Regiment 
of the Illinois Cavalry . . . fell at the battle of 



Corinth. Out of the madness of the creature called 
war, came the soft gentle voice of Abraham Lincoln. 
ABRAHAM LINCOLN: Edgar Murney, Jr. 
UNION OFFICER: A. V. FLOWER. 
CONFEDERATE OFFICER: Walter Supinger. 
Sponsored by: Tyrian chapter No. 61, Royal Arch 

Masons. 
AND PEOPLE FROM PREVIOUS EPISODE 

EPISODE ELEVEN 
"The Underground To Freedom" 

The early Polo citizens took a strong anti-slavery 
stand and in these days before the outbreak of the 
Civil War, Polo served as one of the important 
stations on the "Great Underground Railroad," ex- 
tending from the slave states in the South, to the 
Canadian Frontier . . . Hundreds of fugitive slaves 
in their desperate flight to freedom, crossed the 
river, and passed through Polo; finding shelter and 
a peaceful haven for a few hours . . . Some slaves 
stayed Among the well noted and dearly loved 
were, Minerva and Black Betty. 
"THE DELIVERER": Russell Poole 
BLACK BETTY: Calvin Ebersole. 
MINERVA: Jim Kilday 

EPISODE TWELVE 
"The Gay 90's" 

Changes were taking place all over the country 
as the Twentieth Century Dawned ... In Polo, 
the merchants were putting in plate glass windows; 
electric lights came in 1896. Life moves at a faster 
pace. Here we are at a 4th of July Picnic . . . 
sometime around the turn of the century. You just 
had to sample your girl friend's lunch. You were 
wearing your derby and peg-top trousers . . . she 
was wearing those "leg-o'-mutton" sleeves! Before 
the day was over you had your Tin-type taken. Ev- 
er3'body was having a grand time. 
ELMER THE PHOTOGRAPHER; 
Sponsored by: Polo Rotary Club. 
THOSE BATHING BEAUTIES 
Sponsored by: Polo Evening Woman's Club. 
Mrs. Harold Johnson, Mrs. Paul Webster, Mrs. 
Stanley Webster, Mrs Don Truckenbrod, Mrs. Jas. 
Hawk," Mrs. Joe Jobst, Mrs. Robert Keefer, Mrs. 
Marshall Schell, Mrs. Richard Schell, Mrs. John 
Merry, Mrs. Anthony Smith, Mrs. James O'Connor, 
Mrs. Russell Kramer, Mrs. Richard Folk, Mrs. Earl 
Groves, Mrs. Willard Hogge, Mrs. Charles Ketner, 
Mrs. Robert Lund. 
KEYSTONE KOP: Larry Kilday. 
THE "CAN CAN" 
Sponsored by: Rufflettes 

Randi Joiner, Karen Joiner, Beverly Turek, Juli- 
anne Doyle, Theresa Long, Alice Boddiger, Sue Ann 
Cannon, Bonnie Cannon, Carol Reichard, Carolyn 
Higley. 

GAY 90'S WOMEN 
Sponsored by: Aplington Peaches. 
Mrs. Richard Rinard, Mrs. Robert Duncan, Mrs. 
Lee Schuh, Mrs. Fred Capaul, Mrs. James Shade- 
waldt, Mrs. Lester Schick, Mrs. Wayne Janecek, 
Mrs. Gale Reinstra, Mrs. Russell Haak. 
GAY 90'S MEN 

Sponsored by Black Bandettes, Men's Garden Club, 
Ralph Keckler, William Dew, Garland Grace, My- 
ron Van Cleave, E. J. Diehl, Bob Lund. 
GAY 90'S MEN and WOMEN 
Sponsored by: Black Bandettes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Junior Wiens, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Gasmund, Mr. and Mrs. Dean Cox, Mr. and Mrs. 
Byron Blum, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Van Oosten, Mr. 
and Mrs. Jacob Jecklin, Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Am- 
beau, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Long, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harvey Shrader, Mr. and Mrs. Max Shrader, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ed Yingling. 



48-F 



OUR CHURCHES 

BROOKVILLE E. U. B. CHURCH 
Rev. C. J. Krell, pastor 

CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 
Rev. Hubert Newcomer, pastor 

EAST JORDAN E. U. B. CHURCH 
Rev. Eugene Moore, pastor 

ELKHORN E. U. B. CHURCH 
Rev. Harvey D. Gabel, pastor 

EVAN. UNITED BRETHREN CHURCH 
Rev. Ira Wilson, pastor 

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Clifton E. Butler, pastor 

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Bertram Davies, pastor 

METHODIST CHURCH 
Rev. Ben F. White, pastor 

OPEN BIBLE CHURCH, WOOSUNG 
Rev. R. G. Foster, pastor 

PINE CREEK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Allan T. Shaw, pastor 

ST. MARY'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 
Rev. James Burke, pastor 

ST. MARK'S LUTHERAN CHURCH 
Rev. K. E. Irvin, pastor 



Centennial 
Plane Flights 

See Polo from the air! Enjoy a thrilling 
view of the city. Flights daily, day or 
night. Bring your camera! 



AERIAL SPRAYING 

Demonstrations conducted for 
interested parties. 



Management of 



Hamilton Airport 



Phone 6-9261 



Polo 



^meca 



Incorporated 



fom^Hy lM.%iXgl.M 



MANUFACTURERS OF INDUSTRIAL REFRIGERATION 

AND HEATING EQUIPMENT FOR MEAT AND FOOD 

PACKING, PROCESSING AND STORAGE 



Page 48-G 



GAY 90'S BOYS AND GIRLS 

Sponsored by: Black Bandettes, 

Jane Gasmund, JoAnn Gasmund, Elaine Jecklin, 

Ruth Ann Jecklin, Pamela Wiens, Lorraine Long, 

Michael Blum, Stanley Van Oosten, James Shrader, 

Larry Blum, Kevin Wiens, Eugene Schick. 

EPISODE THIRTEEN 
"Take Me Out To The Ball Game" 

One of Polo's favorite sports has been baseball . . 
and we certainly put out some great teams .... 
So let's return to those days . . . not too long ago! 
THE TEAM: Gareth Porter, Max Snook, Robert 
Dempsey, Bob Folk, Randall Barnhart, Don Miller, 
Carl Dauphin. 

THE BATTER: Steve Parrett. 
THE UMPIRE: Dave Mosher. 

EPISODE FOURTEEN 
"In Memoriam" 

It is 1914 and President Wilson has protested un- 
restricted submarine warfare as the War Clouds 
once again appear on the horizon . . . Now, on 
April 6, 1917, the United States declares war! And 
Polo proudly gave of her sons and daughters in 
"this conflict to end all wars" . . . Here we pay 
tribute to those "Buddies" who never returned and 
to all the boys who marched off to the tunes of 
"Over There" and "Tipperary" during World War 
One . . . 

OFFICER: Paul Fouke. 
Sponsored by: V. F. W. 
BUGLER: Gary Van Cleave. 
TROOPS: Sponsored by V. F. W. 

EPISODE FIFTEEN 
"The Silent Flickers" 

The War brought about progress in industry — in 

fact, after the War the United States went into an 

age of progress . . . and in Polo . . . progress was 

under way . . . Do you remember when Vaudeville 

began to suffer when the "Silent Flickers" arrived 

about 1908? Perhaps you remember the old movie 

house that was on the second floor of the Getzen- 

daner Building? 

The lights are dimming . . . 

THEDA BAR A (the Vamp Siren of the Screen): 

Iris Sweet 
RUDOLPH VALENTINO (the Famous Lover): 

Ralph Joynt 
HUBBY (The Villian): Bob Pollock 

EPISODE SIXTEEN 
"The Daze of The Flappers" 

This is the era of "plus fours," brazen "bobbed 

hair," radio, flagpole sitting, ukeleles, "talking 

pictures" . . . and yes . . . home brew! Only last 

week a fellow named Lindberg made a non-stop 

flight across the ocean all by himself! But the big 

"memory" of the "Twenties" will be that latest . . 

cartilage-crushing . . . dance craze . . . "The 

Charleston". 

ROARING 20'S BOYS 

Sponsored by: Prairie Flowers. 

Gary Dusing, Richard SchoU, Douglas Frison, John 

Engel, Gene Haines, Robert Cassens, Larry Hack- 

barth, Philip Frey. 

ROARING 20'S GIRLS 

Sponsored by: Prairie Flowers. 

Alice Poffenberger, Diane Dickerson, Sue Ellen 

Ketner, Kaye White, Shirley Moeller, Jean Scott, 

Sherry Carden. 

EPISODE SEVENTEEN 
"On All Fronts" 

We are getting close to the present again . . . now 
... it is the afternoon of Sunday, December 7, 1941 



. . . Suddenly, the peace of the Sabbath dusk is 
disrupted by the alarming news of the Attack on 
Pearl Harbor . . . Once again the rumbling sounds 
of War reach the ears of the surprised Nation! . . . 
It is the next day and we are catapaulted into ano- 
ther World Turmoil! And, like their fathers in the 
first conflict, the sons and daughters of former 
veterans took up arms in the defense of their coun- 
try. We take time out in our story of Polo to com- 
memorate both those who made the supreme sacri- 
fice and those living who fought on all fronts for 
the Cause of World Peace in this Second Siege For 
Freedom. 

RED CROSS WORKERS: Gladys Hammer, Hazel 
Franks, Ruby Brodie, Wilda Kitzmiller. 
Sponsored by: Marco Belles. 
U. S. O. HOSTESS: Irene Kalas. 
Sponsored by: Marco Belles. 
JANE FROHMAN: Catherine Styczynski. 
Sponsored by: Marco Belles. 
SOLDIERS: 

Sponsored by: American Legion and V. F. W. 
Paul Webster, Richard Kjolsing, George Swallow, 
Oscar Olson, Robert Galor, John Brockwell, Axel 
Olsen, Kenneth Brown, Orville Rucker, Carl Smith, 
Max Snook, Kenneth Gaul, Dick Poole. 

EPISODE EIGHTEEN 
"The Beginning Or The End" 

With the arrival of the 1940's there came Man's 
knowledge of splitting the Atom . . . and with it 
came the ingenuity and the means either to har- 
ness its power for the good or the destruction of 
the World . . . Since the time when our Second 
World War was coming to a close and through our 
struggle in Korea, when once again our young citi- 
zens of Polo answered the Call, the threat of a new 
engine of War has dangled over our heads like the 
Sword of Damocles . . . Shall our knowledge of 
the splitting of the Atom be used to insure the be- 
ginning of a better Future, or shall it signify The 
Beginning of the End? To bring you closer to its 
tremendous import, we here simulate the explosion 
of an Atomic Bomb . . . 

EPISODE NINETEEN 
"To The Future" 

We bring back all of our People of the Past . . . 
The Indians, Pioneers, Statesmen, Dignitaries, Old 
Fashioned Folks, Soldiers, Gay Nineties, Revellers — 
all the memorable Characters in the story of "OUR 
Century" . . . through more than a century of 
living, breathing, dramatic action . . to summarize 
once again all the stirring realism that has illumi- 
nated our Past and Present . . We now salute Polo's 
Second Century. 
ENTIRE CAST. 



ABOUT THIS PROGRAM 

Now that the Souvenir Program is in your 
hand the Co-Chairmen wish to acknowledge the 
fine craftsmanship of certain people whose com- 
bined skill and imagination made this book possi- 
ble. The program w?s a joint production of the 
Tri-County Press and the B. F. Shaw Printing Co. 
of Dixon, certain employees of which firms, with 
some others, were directly engaged on this project, 
as follows: 

Mann Bros., Mt. Morris Cover Art 

Mrs. C. E. Butler, Polo Linotype 

William Kline, Polo Linotype 

C. E. Camery, Polo Adv. Composition 

C. H. Fahrney, Polo Letterpress 

Bert Nordgren, Polo Photography 

Ray Tingleaf, Dixon Offset Supr. 

Wm. Ogan, Dixon Offset Camera 

LeRoy Halbmaier Offset Plates 

Frank Marshall, Darwin Slain Offset Press 



48-H 




Nearly everyone knows of the wagon 
and buggy shop operated by John P. Miller, 
father of Delia Miller, but few know of the 
Brown Buggy Shop. Brown was in business 
on the site of Dr. H. C. Curtis's office. In the 
back row only the first, Harry Murray, and 



the last, George Eakle, are known. First at 
the left in the front row is James Bracken 
and next to him is W. F. Clothier, father of 
C. Roland Clothier. Picture is the property 
of Miss Delia Miller, daughter of John P. 
Miller, maker of fine buggies and wagons. 




Page 49 



AUIOMOBILE 

A^D TRUCK 

Motor Repairs 


Plumbing-Heating 
Appliances 

Full Line of Plumbing Fixtures 
and Heating Units 


Gasoline - Tires 
Lubrication 


PROPANE GAS 

For all Purposes 


JOHN J. SENN 

Brookville— Polo Rt. 2 


Riggs Plumbing 

207 N. Jackson Ave. 


Telephone Brookville 2311 


Phone 6-2302 PCLO 




Girls ever have been beautiful, viz., Ex- 
hibit A, Miss Faith More, kindergarten tea- 
cher of the late 1890s, later Mrs. Charles Kel- 
ler, at the left. No. 2 Mary Barber, 3 Lucia 
Barber, 4 Gilbert Beck. 5 Ethel Myers, 6 Fred 
Zick, 7 Ray Shafer, 8 Emily Dingley, 9 Edna 



Myers, 10 Elizabeth Waterbury, 11 Blanche 
Freeman, 12 Winnie Sweeney, 13 Phoenie 
Woodruth, 14 Mae Bracken (Diehl), 15 Haz- 
el Donaldson, 16 Clara Perkins, 17 Paul Clop- 
per, 18 Alice Waterbury, 19 Russell Garman. 
Scene: in front of the old Pearson home. 



Page 50 




Terracing - Earth Moving - Grading 
Done to Your Satisfaction 



QUARRY 
PRODUCTS 

• Limestone 

• Road Rock 

• Fill 

Telephone 6-3172 



Farm terracing has proved its value 
in preventing erosion and conserving 
moisture in dry seasons. Let us give 
you further information. 

We also do Public Works — earth 
moving and grading — Excavations for 
basements — and anything where big 
power earth moving is required. Feel 
free to ask for information when your 
job is cooking. 



Best Wishes For the ISext Hundred! 



'N & L Construction Co. 



POLO, ILL. 



Page 51 



■iJJJV" *' '- ^.' 



'pe^ 



■^Hpjx^ 



><^-' 



Sl^' 



C0^ 



^^%^ 



^JJ\S^^^' 






.•o^^,^.s^^- 




•J; 



Yours is an enviable heritage, one hun- 
dred years of active growth and progress 
-and still going strong. Congratulations ! 

Through the years, together with pre- 
decessor companies Northern Illinois Gas 
Company has progressed along with the 
communities it serves . . . constantly ex- 
panding and improving to give even bet- 
ter service. 

Now, more than ever, GAS continues 
to ease household drudgery, performing 
tasks automatically to give carefree com- 
fort to the daily living of over a half-mil- 
lion northern Illinois families. 



WHATEVER THE JOB - 

cooking, refrigeration, water 
heating, incineration, clothes 
drying or home heating . . . 

GAS Does It Better 
... For LESS! 



NORTHERN 
ILLINOIS 



6as 



COMPANY 



Page 52 



COMINO! 

AT BARBER'S PARK, ' 

Tuesday, Sept. ist. 

Not KELLY'S ARMY or even the 
Oregon Base Base Club, but a Day of 
Excitement and Pleasure; a battle be- 
tween the Celebrated Ball Champions, 

The Exchange Alley Nine 

-- AND — 

The Smoky Doolittles 

THE -SMOKY DOOLITTLES." 




THE "EXCHANGE ALLEY " NINE. 

A FEW OF THE FEATURES- 

Jolmoic McOrath will play shoe! on jsc base in a pair oj 
Icvely green lights. 

Br) am Barber i.and Billy) will play left field with the black 

R. G, Shumway will figun; on th« interest o( the crowd 



iibing , 



r\(» rtie game. 

Henr>- Wolf will attempt the -feet- o( cJ 

Avey & Worley will pturtoTm theircelebr; 
sod (lance during the aiternoon. 

"Black" Fraser's special sale will occur after the eleventh 
jnnmg. 



song 



play horse- 
Sammy Clark 

Charley Wolfe in center field will be 
No catl..ie^3 allowed d»riag J 



sh transportation for the 



i rendition of "I'm 



don juggling feat is worth going 



Mead" during the game, 
ase wTii Interest you. 
;n.e the bananas, Sanimie 
Jtton or Sunshine ia Ex- 



The Exchange Hotel will serve 

Chaddork's red smrt act amrBt 

Immediately after Wise & Artz 
Goldsmith will recite "The Lost 1 
change Alley." 

Clifi Myers' and Tom Bracken's sitirl dance will ai 

Deacon Bun 
Great excitei 

Doc Snyder, the E 
which will bedissecte.f t.y t-ioi. 



Alle 



bndi; 



balj. 



will giv 



"hot drops' 



atcher. Watcti the Prolei 

H. E. Spear, the 
the other side. 

Jim Allab^n is to hold down third bag (with both ieeu in 
a benuulul new costume, while Henty Schell will kIvc inlre- 
<l«f ni latin quotations, ii the crowrl allows. 

Judec Campbell will bring bi« suaniy along with him It's 






sing- 



Fred Zick, in short pants, will perform wonders t 



second 



Brouse Sanborn will weigh tfic ball—still. 
Leayitt Moore will play head coacher. if permitted 
Addison SheU wnll give a long talk oni6 to ., followed to ^ 
Oeo. Poole on bound Money, il Schell gets throuf h 
~. Bob Allen, in handme downs, will Ik: seen in ei nt^ A.i i 
fc Satn Y„kel with hi. icy stare on 3d l,a«., will 1,^^" 7™ 

Lu "^. J^'ii " p.'" i"««'" '" "«•" 'i'W' »»<l H, B. will 
Bif'ffliint the ball in the leiL 

/ Burt, by whom the ball will be Stricken, will coyer the >d 
otfl and more, too. 

Dan, will "Beard" the ball b<-hiod the bat. ^ 

Willie Schell will give the f;irl9 the "marble heart" 
uaony Holmes win'miiR that lamiliar vong "Good B 
Polo PanU Co will liuiii»h "pants" for the runnen.'' 
"Oliver" O'Kaoe, on "How 1 became a puliiiciaa," will be 



i Bye." 



MUSIC by POLO CORNET BAND 

GENERAL ADM ISSIOW 15c LAD IES Jt KlUS, 15c. 
TBI run nccmuL 



Sf 



Excavating 

of All Kinds 

# Sand 

# Gravel 

# Limestone 

AGRICO FERTILIZERS 
SUPER PHOSPHATE 



BOWERS BROS. 

Polo Rt. 2 
Brookville 2298 - Rur. Lanark 16M 




Armour &l Co* 



HOG BUYING 
STATION 

Phone 6-2142 



John M. Davis, Buyer 



Page 53 



Polo observed the 75th anniversary of the 
first settlement at Buffalo Grove, February 
16-17, 1905. Below is the poster that announc- 
ed the affair. On it you will find Charles W. 



Joiner, surveyor of the original Town; Zenas 
Aplington, founder; Rev. Peter Cartwright, 
famous pioneer preacher, who was resident 
at Buffalo Grove two years, and others. 






THURSDAY EVENING. FEB. 16tll 

At Polo Operoc House 

To celebrate the 7 Sth Anni\ersar\- ol the First Settlement in Oyle County at i 

Buffalo Gro\e, and the StUh Anriiver5ar\- of the Founding of Polo, under the 

au.spices of the 

Polo HistoricQLl Society 

(jooj A\uMC will be a paM lA the fijilowini; pro_i;|-ani; 



Ho n . jxihn "TV MH^mtt i, ,y„.l(j . ,, 
Toa^t, "Karlv Da\s" 

"Material OnclopniLiit ot' La^t Fit't)' ^'car 

" *'()ur Social l'ro«;ress" .... 

" "Toda\ and Tnrinirrou" 

" "It Came to l'a^-." .... 



Toast Master 

J. VV. Clinton 

Hon. [as. P. Wilson 

Mrs. I. M. Bridf!;man 

Ma\or Fred /.ick 

Rev. l)r. J. H. More 



A tew mementos of Pioneer days in Bulfalo and Chambers Groves will be on 
exhibition. Polo Women's Relict Corps caterers. Plates, 50c. Tickets on 
sale at Postottiec. Come and let us get acquainted with the old days. All 
are inMted. BY ORDKR COM.MITTKK. 





Page 54 




^ 



A Familiar Sight About 1908 — Harry Miller In His Runabout 




A Quality Egg 
Market for Producers 



• Special prices to producers with a 
Quality Controlled Program. 

• Special package for grocers, restaurants, 
and hotels with discriminating customers. 

• Special dealership to hatcheryman and feed dealers 
interested in a modern marketing program. 



Ramp^s Quality Egg Market 



"Jake" Ramp, Owner 

Polo - Phone 6-3752 



"Art" Olsen, Sales Mgr. 

Park Ridge - Phone 3-1681 



Page 55 




Black Betty Hamlin 

"Black Betty" was a term of endearment 
spoken by the people of Our Town who knew 
and loved Elizabeth Hamlin, Negro woman 
who was once a slave. Black Betty was 
brought to Polo from Kentucky by Maria 
Waterbury to care for her sick mother, Mrs. 
Samuel Waterbury. 

Samuel Waterbury's home was on the 
site now occupied by Hank Van Oosten's 
service station. It was a large home that dur- 
ing the Civil War and before was used as a 
station on the Underground Railroad, a 
method of aiding runaway slaves to Canada 
and freedom. 

When Mrs. Waterbury died, Black Betty 
had to shift for herself. She soon entered the 
household of D. M. Leal whose wife was ill. 
During Black Betty's stay with the Leals 
their son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
George H. Butts and their family, came to 
live with the Leals when Mrs. Leal was tak- 
en sick. 

The only living daughter of the Leals is 
now Mrs. Walter Maxey who well remembers 
Black Betty. Little Frances Butts is seen in 
the above picture with Black Betty. Eight 
years after she had entered the Leal house- 
hold Black Betty sought a life for herself and 
Mr. Leal saw that she had a place. Black 
Betty bought the little one-room house that 
now stands one block east of the EUB church 
and the second house south on the west side 
of the street. 

Black Betty lived in Polo many years, a 
respected member of the community. She 
lies buried in Fairmount Cemetery, the only 
member of her race to rest there. 



FEED 
GRINDING 

Custom Mixing - Delivery 






Feeds 

and 

Seeds 



FERTILIZERS 

GRAINS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

Haldane Elevator Co» 

Robert A. Kane 
PHONES 



Polo 6-2376 



Forreston 85X 




A COMPLETE Service 

• TIRES and TUBES 

• BATTERIES 

• WASHING 

• LUBRICATING 

• POLISHING 

Pick Up & Delivery 



Turek's M^m Service 



210-212 S. Division 
Night Phone 6-4392 Day Phone 6-9142 



Page 56 




Civil War veterans had given up marching at celebrations by 1911. Seen riding behind a 
span of dappled grays are "Pinky" Barnes, Abraham Wright, David Strock and John Weis- 
ner. Others are unknown. Last of the Boys in Blue answered the call many years ago. 



Enjoy A 


First Christian 


Home Cooked 


Church 


Meal 


W. Mason St., Polo, 111. 


• 


"Not the only Christians, but Christians Only." 


Service From 5 :30 A. M. 
to 10:00 P. M. 


Morning Worship 9:30 a.m. 

Bible School 10:20 a.m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p.m. 

Mid-Week Service Wed., 8:00 p.m. 


• 


"Where The Bible Speaks, We Speak." 


Reckless Cafe 

Phone 6-2924 


Clifton E. & Garnett L. Butler 

ministers 

Parsonage: 307 S. Congress 



Page 57 



harnharfs 

MOiEL 




Polo, 111. 


\^^^^^ 


* 


Congratulations, 


MODERN ROOMS 


Polo, on your 


• Air Conditioned 


100th 


• Free Television 


Anniversary 

• 

Pines Drive 'In Theatre 

Opposite White Pines 


Phone 6-2423 


Fay Barnhart, Prop. 


Rts. 26 and 64 Jnct., 4 mi. North of Polo 


Phone 6-0624 




Constructing Polo's first sewer system in 1906, Horatio Wales St., mayor. J. T. McGrath at 
machine's left, and S. N. Dodson on the curb, watch proceedings. The public improvements 
were only beginning. This scene shows the crew busy on South Franklin Street. 

Page 58 



S LUMBER ^ 



/s rsS^EAiKHY 




A COMPLETE BUILDING SERVICE 

Doane Authorized Builder 

HOMES PENTA POLES 

REPAIR WORK STRONGBARN ROOFING 

FARM BUILDINGS POLE FRAME BUILDINGS 

FARMERS' LUMBER and SUPPLY CO. 

Price Hcckman, Pres. Arch M. Hamilton, Vice-Pres. 

E. R. Knudson, Sec.-Treas. 

Polo Phone 6-3652 



Congratulations To Polo On 
Her 100th Anniversary! 




Doane Agricultural Service, Inc* 

Farm Management — Appraisal 
Research and Consultation 

Oregon, Illinois Phone: Oregon 505 



Page 59 



DEFENDJIBILITY 



couns! 




A Complete Line Of 



Purina Chows For 
Every Feeding Need! 



Purina 






PHONE 6-0372 

Buyers and Sellers of 



Grain - Feeds - Seeds 



Seed Cleaning and Treating 



Feed Grinding and Mixing 

Phones ^40^2 

Polo Elevator Co* 



Polo, Illinois 



E. H. Cassens, Owner 



Robert Higley, Manager 



Page 60 




Declining Years of the Old High School — About 1898 




Dr. Donald W. Clothier 

Optometrist 

Phone 6-0462 - Polo, 111. 
Office Above Clothier's Drug Store 



Ben Franklin 

Home Owned - Nationally Known 



A friendly merchandising service in 
this 100-year-old community. Built by 
your continued patronage and the com- 
bined efforts of the Raley Family. 

WE THANK YOU! 

It has been a pleasure to serve you. We 
promise improved service for you. 



Lillian & Luther Raley 

and Sons 
Wayne - Edward - Edmund - Robert 



Page 61 




It's been a long trail from the times de- 
picted in this photo which shows "Charlie" 
Winders in front of his restaurant on the 
south side of Mason street. For one thing, 
bananas don't hang outside any more and 
little girls, like the one shown, Zulu Bittin- 



ger, are adorned in quite different costumes 
for 'street wear.' Her friend with the fur was 
Ida Coffman, later Mrs. Ollie Strock, mother 
of Reeve Strock. It seems that "Charlie" was 
doing quite a bit of business, but he soon en- 
tered the clothing line. 



CENTURY 

TIRES - BATTERIES 

* 


MODERN 
ROOMS 


Dividends Paid Here 


For Tourists 


* 
BILL SHAW, OWNER 


and 




Steadies 


BjlW***^ 301 so. FRANKLIN ST. 


• 

Parkside Hotel 


POLO, ILLINOIS 


Phone 6-0122 



Page 62 



Congratulations on 
Polo's First 100 Years 

Our old friends have been 
with us for Thirty-Two years 
now. 

We hope our new friends 
can do the same! 

Drop In And See Us. 

RECK^S 

VARIETY STORE 

POLO, ILLINOIS 



Qood Food 
Is Our 



Speciality! 



MEAT 
MILK 
FRUIT 
GROCERIES 
ICE CREAM 
VEGETABLES 
FROZEN FOOD 
SOFT DRINKS 

Miller's Market 

The Clover Farm Store 
Polo Illinois 




'When You Call - We're Ready to HauV 

Livestock - Feeds - Fertilizers 

Day or Night - Phone 6-1722 

WOLF TRUCK LINE 

ELWYN C. WOLF, Owner 



Page 63 



Delicious Pan Fried Chicken 




Wednesdays - Sundays 



Chops - - Shrimp 

Fountain Service 

Hawes Beverage - Superior Coffee 



Welcome To Good Food At 



The Corner Cafe 



124 E. MASON ST. 




Page 64 




Curls, bangs and barefeet were all in vogue 
on this school day along about 1897-8. The seventh 
and eighth grades were putting their best feet for- 
ward. Front row: Grace Tice, Katie Moll, Rosa 
Green, Dora Hurdle, Delia Beck, Bill Beck. Charlie 
Allen, Johnny Travis, Grace Wolf, Edith Unger, 
Sylvia Holland, Miss Alice Vanciel, teacher. 

Second row: Fred Ferguson, Irma Wolf, uni- 
dentified, Faye Miller, Fred Manning, George Hoff- 
man, Kittle Rogers, Nellie Butts. Flox Joiner, Bob 
Brooks, ? Solenberger or Pearlie Brenner, Alice 



Mead, unidentified, Guy Waterbury, Elmer Weaver. 

Third row: Ross Cornelius, Mamie Dodson, 
George Travis, Red "Pat", Freddie Barkman, 
Harvey Huffman, Leo Devaney, Anna Bracken, 
Grace Smith, Grace Waterbury, Blanche Swartz, 
Zulu Bittinger, Pat Kenyon. 

Back row: Bob Bracken, Walter Holland, Jen- 
nie Hunt, Eddie Spickler, Fred Wise, Charles Bos- 
omeyer, Mary Magne, Frank Huffman, Letta Davi- 
son, Ross Miller, Dora Lindner, May AUaben, EUie 
Naylon. 





Ihe Manor 


Dr. George A. Kopp 


House 


Optometrist 


303 North Franklin 




POLO, ILL. 

Polo's Only- 
Convalescent Home 


PHONE 6-3054 




WINDERS STORE - POLO 


ALTA GUNDLACH 




Owner and Operator 



Page 65 




Isaac Chambers, first while settler in county, rests in a lonely graveyard on the farm of Lee Rus- 
sell near Brookville. Stone is supported by C. J. Wolf and Clifford Powell. Chambers died in 1845. 




Our Business Means 



BETTER HEALTH IN POLO 



We hope to be a part of our community 

1Q^/^ During most of the second Hundred Years! y 

-*-^-'" Congratulations to everyone on the Centennial! ♦ 

We Help Keep Our Town Clean! 

Wagner Disposal Service 



Larry Wagner, Prop. 



POLO 



Phone 6-1705 



Page 66 




Fred Hendrix and Team — Joiner Woods Picnic Aboul 1905 



The Union Central 
Life Insurance Company 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 

1867 - Our 90th Anniversary ^ 1957 

Life Insurance and Annuities In Force $2,408,000,000.00 

Amount Paid To Policyholders and Beneficiaries 
Since 1867 - $1,598,722,000. 

Life Insurance and Annuities Issued in 1956 $372,567,406. 

RICHARD A. FOLK 



Polo 



District Agent 

Tele. 6-0913 



Illinois 



Page 67 




Judge John D. Campbell was a jurist but he was more widely known among the younger 
set for his large deer herd. Sunday afternoons were always good for a big gallery. 







STANDARD 








PRODUCTS 

* 


^^^ 


Glod You Came 


Livestock 


to our 
Centennial 


Buying Station 


Have Fun 


For latest competitive 
markets on livestock call — 


Sincerely 


George Swallow 

Phone 

Polo 6-4482 


E. M. TYNE 

Complete Line Of 
Standard Products 



Page 



1851 Letter Tells of RR Survey 



An unsigned letter written on the front 
and back of a beautifully colored, if not geo- 
graphically perfect, map gives present day 
folk a glimpse behind the misty records that 
preceded the coming of the railroad to this 
area in January of 1855. The map is dated 
Aug. 4, 1851. 

The identity of the writer as well as the 
person to whom the letter was written will 
forever remain in the mythical archives of 
local history. But one fact emerges from a 
reading of the letter and study of the map: 
much speculation was abroad as to just where 
the railroad would go. The choice was from 
Dixon to Galena via western Ogle county and 
Freeport, and from Dixon to Galena via Sa- 
vanna. 

"I take opportunity by this present let- 
ter," the 1851 writer began, "to give you an 
outline of the surveys of the railroad through 
our region as near as I can by observation 
and reliable hearsay. You may be assured of 
its correctness as far as the route is concern- 



ed in its general course varying only by 
slight curves. 

"The map embraces parts of Stephenson, 
Winnebago, Lee and Ogle. Ogle is laid off in 
townships with their names printed upon 
them. The course of the river is nearly cor- 
rect, as near anyhow as is general on a map. 
The route to Savanna in Carroll county I do 
not know anything about. 

"You will discover by looking on the map 
a line of blue and dotted on the east side. By 
recent knowledge obtained that is nearer the 
track of the second surveyed route in our 
region and consequently crosses your land. 

"It has been told me that there are strong 
prejudices in favor of the Savanna route as 
the distance is 18 miles nearer than by Free- 
port to Galena and the highest hill to Galena 
by Savanna is 52 feet per mile and by Free- 
port 90 feet. 

"We shall know in a few weeks. We are 
all well and have done harvesting. Wheat 
better than anticipated. Aug. 4, 1851." 




• FENCING 

• ROOFING 

• COAL 

PHONE 6-4032 



A^ }♦ Hersch Co* 

George Linker 



Best Wishes! 

# Frigidaire 

# Maytag 

# Speed Queen 

TAPPAN and MONARCH 
APPLIANCES 

Hardware & Housewares 
Sargent's Paints 



Hough Hardware 

LeRoy Rebuck, Mgr. 
Phone 6-1952 



Page 69 



1874 



1957 



Growing With Polo 

Thru Low Cost Coverage 

The Buffalo Mutual Fire Insurance Company looks forward to an expand- 
ing business in the busy years ahead . . . writing fire and extended cover- 
age policies. 

1874 . 34 POLICIES IN FORCE 

1957 . ♦ $8,000,000 Coverage 



1874 Directors 

F. S. Jones, President 

E. S. Waterbury, Treasurer 

Jordan Lawrence 

C. G. Holbrook 

A. F. Moore 

A. J. Sanborn 

Elias Osterhoudt 

C. W. Sammis 

W. M. Mason 



1957 Directors 

Ralph Stuff, President 

Harold Johnson, Vice-President 

Russell Scholl, Sec.-Treas. 

Floyd Cross 

Ray Hammer 

Herbert Coffman 

Ralph Avey 

Fred Graehling 

John Reid 



ORGANIZED March 14, 1874, Buffalo Mutual is authorized to insure 
risks in the following 12 townships: Buffalo, Pine Creek, Woosung, Eagle 
Point, Lincoln, Brookville, Mt. Morris, Oregon, Nashua and Grand Detour 
in Ogle county; Jordan in Whiteside county; and Palmyra township in Lee 
county. 

Buffalo Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company 

Offices at Scholl Insurance Agency on S. Franklin St. 



Page 70 




A U. S. Post Office was established at 
Buffalo Grove, Feb. 12, 1883. In January of 
1855 the name was changed to Polo. The post- 
master, George D. Read, moved the office 



to Polo during the night and opened the next 
morning in the above building, now Keck- 
ler's Store. This strategy, a "fait accompli," 
worked like oil on the troubled local waters. 



John Deere Farm Implements 



FARMHAND 

Power Tools 

and 

Loaders 






QUALITY FARM 
EQUIPMENT 



DeLAVAL 

and 

DARI-KOOL 

Bulk Coolers 



FOX Choppers and Bloivers - - - 

- - - A,0. SMITH Harvestores 

Polo Farm Store 



Phone 6-0132 



Polo 



Page 71 




Polo H. S. graduates of Class of 1902 are, 
left to right, first row — Charles D. Row- 
land and Clinton G. Geary; second row — Lor- 
ena Poole, Edna Getzendaner, Frances (Cav- 
anaugh) Wise, May (Kriebel) Dommell, Lil- 
lian Poole, Ruth (Noble) Hendrix, Charlotte 
(Davidson) Lindemann. 



Third row — Susie (Long) Knodle, Irma 
(Stouffer) Mosteller, Jessie (Gibbs) Griffin, 
Bertha (Savage) Losacker, Mary (Ruth) Fike, 
Bernice (Flower) Hornby, Pearle Joiner, 
Pearle (Worden) Clement, Albert C. Moll, 
Josephine Bingaman, June (Strickler) Etnyre, 
Alice (Klock) Neeck, Guy I. Bradbury. 



LUDWIG MILK CO. 



"The Finest Since 1911" 



McHenry - - Elgin - - Chicago 

Country Plant - Polo, 111. 



Page 72 



:^ 



'^'■ 



First (i I'adiiadiii; Class 



Polo High School, 



P P^E S H Y r E P^l A N C H r P/ hi . 



ON FRIDAY EVENING, JUNE 14th, 1872. 



I^TJSIC BY 



Polo ;G'orni.t B \,n)>. 



MUSIC. 

cssAi. ■riiifav'o: ii\i:\ l. iiii'k 

i)tn\M\Tiii\, "ijik'voii i.inoiii." iini:\ \ri,iM,To\.* 

lausic. 

f;ssii."ii«m.." \i\iii (i. i'i:iihi\s. 

m\m\. ■■Hbi ('ill III' III.':" ii;\\h II, |!\m;i;. 

rausxc 

m:\\. ■sri I iikun," Tiii;o\ii: i'. «i;iisti:ii.- 

iii;\Tiii\. ■■Niiid Fiiiiik" j\\ii:s 11. ,\i,i,\i:i;\. 

IWUSIC. 

rK"i'iii:n (.nm, mi- 

\\l,i:iillTlllH, -llir I'imiT ,,1 .,1 l.i.;,r IIIMH n, |;\|;|;|,|;. 

IVIUSIC 

PEINCIPAL'S ADDRESS. 
PEESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. IK. W, W. EUEKS. 

MUS3IC. 

B XN Oei) i C T I ON. 




St» Mark's 
Evangelical Lutheran Church 

The Rev. K. E. Irvin, D. D., S. T. D., Pastor 
"The just shall live by faith" 



Page 73 



You Will Enjoy The 



Lazy Susan 

Consistently the BEST place to EAT 
in northern Illinois! 



CHICKEN 

STEAKS and CHOPS 

SEA FOODS 



Open 11:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 
Closed all day Mondays 

TELEPHONE POLO 6-0620 

Opposite White Pines State Park 



'// It's Good For Polo . . . 
It's GOOD for Bob!" 



Congratulations 

To Polo On It's 

Centennial 



Bob's Barber Shop 

Robert Fouke, Prop. 




Livestock and General Hauling 

QVICK - RELIABLE ■ DEPENDABLE 



DON HOFFMAN 



Phone 6-1592 



Polo 



Page 74 



/Archer 



\ FEED 



St^ 



gr/^ea/^^^ 




ARCHER-DANIELS-MIDLAND CO. 

Feed Sales Offices: 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA • SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 



WELCOME TO POLO! 

You're Welcome to Polo ANY time but especially during 
our Centennial! We have greeted our customers always 
with high quality feeds, seeds, custom grinding, and friendly 
service since May 15, 1929. 

Thanks to all our customers! We cordially invite you to 
visit our elevator while in Polo. We supply daily prices on 
Feeds and Grain. 



Bud 



AXEL 



Edward 






Page 75 




Football caught on early in Polo as this 
1901 photo shows. Nose and shin guards 
were standard equipment for protection 
against the natural hazards of the game. And, 
one might mention, also against the ungen- 
tlemanly conduct of kicking an opposing 
player in the shins or striking him in the 
nose with the hand and fingers tightly clen- 



ched, commonly known as the fist. In the 
back row are Ross Cornelius, Ray Hedrick, 
George Hoffman, R. L. Bracken, Ross Miller, 
Clint Geary, Cliff Smith and Max Allaben. 
Kneeling are Paul Anderson, F. Browning, 
E. Browning, Arch Hamilton and Fred Man- 
ning. Sitting are Albert Moll, and Clare 
Woodruff, captain of the team. 



Congratulations to Polo 
On Its 100th Anniversary 



Dixon, Devine & Ray 



Sherwood Dixon 



ATTORISEYS 

George K. Ray 



Luke R. Morin 



The Polo National Bank Bldg. 
Polo 6-2872 



121 E. First Street 
Dixon 4-1591 



Page 76 



FARMERS! 




Feed Kent 


McSABB 

Funeral Home 


''Feed Without A Filler" 


• 


Plant Hulting's 


On the Spot 


Hybrid Seed Corn 


Ambulance Service 


• 


Polo 6-2402 


FARMERS' 


• 


FEED SERVICE 


Robert E. McNabb 


MAX BODDIGER, PROP. 


Licensed Embalmer & Funeral Director 


Phone 6-2472 




STALEY^S 


Protein ff fp 


BUILDING ^^ 


^^/\^ FERTILIZERS 


MATERIALS ^^^ 


A/w>^ 


^M ^m mf^ 


/^^y^ FENCING 




^Jl 


CEMENT ® ^^i 


^^ LUMBER 


Congratulations to Pc 


lo On The Centennial 


Ph. Polo 6-2658 


Phone Milledgeville 5-3571 


Hazelhurst Luml 


3er & Grain Co» 


HAZELHl 


JRST, ILL. 



Page 77 



County's Geography 

It may come as news to many that the 
area in which Polo, Buffalo Grove and Ogle 
county are included today was once a part of 
"Illinois county." It was attached to the state 
of Virginia bv proclamation made June 17, 
1779. 

County government was situated at Kas- 
kaskia. Actually, the machinery of county 
government was never effectually set up, 
and it soon died of disuse. 

The area north of the Illinois river, 
therefore, continued as a part of Northwest 
Territory until Feb. 3, 1801 on which date 
St. Clair county was created, one of two that 
covered the entire area of the state, then a 
part of the Territory of Indiana. From Feb. 
3, 1803 a brief history of the allegiances of 
what is now Ogle county is in order: 

1809 — St. Clair county came under the 
Territory of Illinois, still covering the north- 
ern two-thirds of the state's area. 

1812 — Madison county covered the north- 
ern two-thirds of the state areas. 

1815 — Ogle county area became a part 
of two counties, Madison and Edwards. The 
line split the state north to south at Byron. 
Still the Territory of Illinois. The western 
part including Polo was then in Madison 
county, the eastern portion in Edwards. 

1816— That part of Ogle that was in Ed- 
wards county became part of Crawford coun- 
ty. West side remained in Madison county. 

1817 — Ogle area split among three coun- 
ties: Eagle Point, Brookville and west part 
of Forreston remained in Madison county; 
Buffalo, Pine Creek and the townships to 
the north became a part of Bond county, 
while the eastern part remained in Crawford. 
Still Territory of Illinois. 

1819 — Territory of Illinois became state 
of Illinois. West part of this county remained 
in Madison; the central part was still in Bond 
county but the eastern portion was changed 
from Crawford to Clark. 

1821 — All that part of Illinois north of 
the Illinois river became one county: Pike. 

1823 — All of this region including what 
is now Ogle county was attached to Fulton 
county for administrative purposes. 

1825 — All of Ogle became a part of Put- 
nam. (Today the smallest county in the state.) 

1827— The west half of Ogle was thrown 
in with the northwest area of the state. It was 
called Jo Daviess county. 

1836 — On Jan. 12 of that year six new 
counties were created, among them Ogle 
county which included all of what is in the 
county today except Eagle Point, Brookville 
and the west part of Forreston. 

1839— Eagle Point, Brookville, and the 
west portion of Forreston township, were 
taken from Jo Daviess and given to Ogle 
county. Thus the county of Ogle was consti- 
tuted as it is today. 



Dining Room 



and 



Curb Service 



South On Rt. 26 



DAVIS 

Drive-in Cafe 

ORVILLE AND BERTHA DAVIS 



SHOP HERE! 

General Line of 

Clothing 

for 

Men and Women 
Boys and Girls 



Thrift Shop 

Ed and Joy Sharkey 
Phone 6-1794 



Page 78 



Plan Now for * » , 
The Next 100 Years! 




Build as your forefathers built— for beauty and 
permanence with superior materials. 



Weyerhauser Lumber 
Celotex Insulation 
Johns-Manville Products 



American Wire Fence 
Flintkote Shingles 
Penta-Treated Posts 



McGrath-Phalen Lumber Co^ 



Established in 1882 by John T. McGrath 



Phone 6-0142 



Polo, 111. 



Page 79 



Feeder 
Cattle 



Brookville 
Jnct. 52 & 64 



Mendota 
Jnct. 52 & 34 



Wehmeyer Bros* 

AUCTIONEERING 

Livestock - Farms - Machinery 
Furniture - Real Estate 



ORLO WEHMEYER 
Ph. 2332 - Brookville 



BOWL- 

# For Health 

# For Pleasure 

# For Fellowship 

FOUNTAIN DRINKS 
SANDWICHES 



Golden Bowl 

WOLFE BROS. 
Al & Ruth :: Wilbur & Renee 











9'' -r- 


, 


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.^.■-•V*' 



--v^JL,-. 



HAMILTON AIRPORT 

Established Sept. 15, 1947 

Arch M. Hamilton, Owner Richard Ritenour, Manager 



Page 





Cocker Spaniel i ». j o' . ■ 

^ Labrador Retriever 



Irish Setter Brjttany Spaniel Chesapeake Bay Retriever Golden Retrie 




Cerniiin Shc.rlha 




Pomeranian Boston Ten 



Toy Manchester Schipperke 

Page 81 



VVel-li C.ri'i l',rnl.r..ke 




Our Conger atulations 

To Polo On The 

CENTENNIAL 



Bob Johnson 



Speed Queen 

Washers and Dryers 



Kelvinator Ranges 

Refrigerators, Steel Cabinets 



Devoe Paints of all Kinds 
"Pride of the Farm" Line 

Open daily to 6 p.m. and 
Saturday to 10 p.m. 

Brown - Lynch - Scott 

Associate Store 

John and Anna Marie Merry 
Owners 




Ogle Service Co» 



JERRY BROOKS 

FS Feeds and Plant Foods 

Phone 6-2377 

POLO, ILLINOIS 



ALPHA BELLOWS 

FS Petroleum Products 

Phone 6-4602 

POLO, ILLINOIS 



Page 82 



Homer C. Curtis, D. V. M. 

Veterinarian 


E. E. McConaughy 

Chiropractic Center 



m,rm i 




FALL FESTIVAL TIME IN 1922 



James T. O'Connor, D. V. M. 

Veterinarian 


Ormond H. Runnels 

Attorney at Law 



Page 83 




Best Wishes to Polo 



at the Beginning of its 



Second Century 



Steve Stanich 



Play Your Choice 



of 



Automatic 
Music 

— at the following 8 places in Polo: 

• Becky's Grill • American Legion 

• Corner Inn • Drenner's Lunch 

• Daisy's Cafe • Steve's Tavern 

• V. F. W. • Well's Gulf 

B & L Distributors 

Dick and Bess Roche 




DEEM 

HEATING and 
SHEET METAL 

Ph. 6-4552 Polo 

PREMIER 

Heating and 
Air Conditioning 

Coal - Oil - Gas 



We specialize in general sheet metal work including gutters, down- 
spouts, kitchen ventilating hoods and all farm metal work. If you have 
furnace troubles, take advantage of our 24-HOUR SERVICE. 

We supply free estimates on new heating or air conditioning units for 
your home. Give us a call. 

'We Sell the BEST and Service the Rest!" 



Page 84 




We Render 



Chicago Motor Club Service 



24 HOURS EVERY DAY 



Phillips Gasoline 



Lee Tires 



We render a COMPLETE Auto and Truck Repair 
Service. Bring your Repair Work here! 



RINARD^S REPAIR 



BASIL RINARD 



Phone 6-3762 



Polo, III. 



Page 85 



C» L. Drennan, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon 


Curtis W. Fisher, D. D. S. 

Dentist 


L. R. McDaniel, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon 


F. L, Markle, D. D. S, 

Dentist 


R. W, Ziegler, M, D. 

Physician and Surgeon 


J. G. Seise, D. D, S. 

Dentist 



Page 




Polo's baseball teams were pretty hot 
along about 1905 as you will see by scrutiniz- 
ing the above scene. Three of the team are 
still around today, now Rev. Joe Lonergan, 
Circuit Judge Robert L. Bracken and William 
Bracken, the 1905 mascot. Since the Harrigan 
brothers of Forreston were on the team it 
might have been called the "P-F Independ- 



ents" B. B. Club. Personnel: standing in back 
row: Joe Lonergan 3B, Bob Bracken CF, P. 
Carey IB, Tim Harrigan RF, R. Wallis LF, 
E. Brooks, Sub. Middle row: J. Netolickly 
SS, H. Cardoza, Mgr., A. Harrigan 2B. Front 
row: J. H. Markhan C, C. S. Baylor P, Bill 
Bracken, mascot, George Begeman P. Since 
those days town team ball has declined. 



Congratulations 
Polo ♦ ♦ ♦ 




On Your 100th 
Anniversary! 



And Many Thanks To Everyone 

From A Former Polo Business Firm 

Wolf Motor Company 



'^Charlie' 



Page 87 



High Protein Blend 

VICTOR 
HYBRIDS 

Plant VICTOR to be Sure 



CERTIFIED SEED OATS 



Victor Brand 

FIELD SEEDS 



POLO SEED CO. 

3 miles North on Route 26 



"Don't Cuss - Call Vs!" 

Polo Body 

and Radiator Shop 

24-Hour Wrecker and Parts 
Service. We fix ANYTHING 
on wheels! Also small engines, 
lawn and power mowers. 



SATISFACTION 
GUARANTEED 

Phone 6-4112 

Clyde and Roberta Powell 

Corner Fulton & Barber 




A Good Place to Trade - A Good Place to Eat! 

Spotlessly Clean - Reasonable Prices 
Harvey SCHWENK'S FOODS Thetaa 



Page 



Home Cooked 
Meals 

Seasoned Just Right ! 



Open All Days 
at 6 A. M. 



Daisy^s Cafe 

602 S. Division 
Phone 6-4704 




Welcome All — 
To The Centennial 



Al Brinker 



3Bt 




AfD 



mi 

TO BE QITEN IN THE 

NSW OPERA HOUSE! 




Will be the great ev ,.- " tho reason. The 
Program given on th'^L evening will be the 
grandest affair that h s ever been presented to 
the public of this city or vicinity. Some of the 
most attractive features of the evening will be 
the Soprano Solo, rendered by 



Of Mt. Morris, also Trombone solo by 



PROF.CW.ARTZ! 

Of Oregon, supported by Polo's popular Vocal 
and Instrumental Soloists. 

THREE GRAND CHORUSES 

Of 50 Voices, accompanied with full Orchestra. 
Fine Orotootj.fl seigntigpc arranged esoeciallv 
for this Concert. Dcuble Male Voice Ouar 
tettes. Mixed Voice Quartettes. Duetts. &c. 

MISS EMMA SPEAR! 

r»IA.INriST A.>JID SJ01L.0ISiT. 

Lovers of Music cai not afford to lose this 
Grand Musical treat. Secure your tickets be- 
fore the best seats a.-e gone. Standing room 
will be at par. 

ADMISSION:-RESERYEO SEAT. 50 CENTS. 

TICKETS ON SALE AT NEWS DEPOT. 



As the above poster reproduction shows Buf- 
falo Town Hall was dedicated in 1888. Con- 
siderable alterations were made in 1917. Last 
changes and additions were made in 1954. 
Dedication was in February 1955. 



Page 



Bituminous 



BLACK 
TOPPING 

# Driveways 

# Parking Lots 

• Alleys 

• Streets 

The Clark Co. 

WAYNE CLARK 
Ph. 6-2822 Polo, 111. 



Complete Line 

of 

Groceries 
Meats 

and 

Ice Cream 

* 

Stauffacher's 

Ferndell Grocery 

Phone 6-4172 
POLO'S NEIGHBORHOOD GROCERY 




Our Sincere Congratulations 

To the People of Polo 

On Their 

lOOth Anniversary 

Freeport Auction Service 

O. N. Johnson, Cashier Freeport C. L. Clevenger, Clerk 

F-A-S REPRESENTATIVES IN THE POLO AREA: 

Fred Krum & Wehmeyer Bros. Dorothy Linker Elery Shank 
Auctioneers Cashier Clerk 

LOCAL BUSINESS REPRESENTATIVE: 
Harry A. Wolf, Phone 6-0683 



Page 90 




Before football and basketball became 
popular towns got hepped up about their fire 
department teams of which Polo had its share 
and won more than an average town's share 
of the honors. One such team is shown above 
with its sponsor, M. E. Schryver I. This is the 
team that won national hook and ladder 
honors at Omaha in 1899. Polo's 1957 firemen 
proudly possess the Seagrave ladder awarded 



these National Champions, a memento of 
other years. In the above picture are, back 
row left to right: Petzy Abbott, William 
Weaver, Clayton Smith, next two from Paw 
Paw, John Miller. Middle row: Frank Inman, 
M. E. Schryver I, the sponsor, William Bark- 
man, Warren Savage. Front row: John 
Weaver, John Abbott, Dallas Wendle. 



1926 - - Our 31st Anniversary - - 1957 



For 31 years Coffey Implement has served the farmers 
of this area with a full and complete line of International 
Farm Equipment. During these years we have backed up 
our sales with Prompt and Efficient Service, including a 
lai-ge stock of parts. Let us serve you. 



To Polo . . . Congratulations 1857-1957 

Coffey Implement Store 




R. A. COFFEY, Owner 



R. E. JONES, Manager 



Page 91 



Welcome 

To Polo's 

CEMEyyiAL 




Bob Locke 

Truck & Auto Repair? 

Polo Phone 6-2992 



Real Estate 

Sales 

* 

Farm & City 

Properties 

* 

Robert E. Smith 

Real Estate Broker 
Phone 6-3122 



i * ^x 




STANDARD 



("AN 




Standard Oil Co. Bulk Delivery 



High Quality Petroleum Products 
R C. ^^Ed'^ Buse Alfred Smith 

Phone 6-2294 Phone 6-0153 

POLO. ILL. 



Page 92 







A'Lure Salon 

PH. 6-0264 

HOURS: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 
Tuesday - Saturday 

Leota Blakeslee 

1st Door North of Gambles 
108 N. Franklin Ave. 


CALL 

CHARMEiTE 

Beauty Salon 

PHONE 6-4002 

For Your New 
Zotos Magic Wrap Tubewave 

Margaret Nighswonger 

National Bank Building 


DOROTHY'S 

BEAUTY 
SERVICE 

For Appointments 
Ph. 6-3774 - Personalized Service 

Dorothy Stauffer 

103 S. Division Ave. 


All Phases of 

Beauty Service 

PHONE 6-2922 

Maxine's 

Beauty Shop 

105 N. Division Ave. 



Page 93 



Enjoy Roller Skating 



at the 



White Pines 
Roller Rink 

* 

TELEPHONES- 

Polo 6-9223 
Mt. Morris 273 

* 

Clyde V. Wishard 



R. R. 1 



Mt. Morris 



MASTER MIX 
FEEDS 

# Red Top Fencing 

# V-C Fertilizers 

# Grass Seeds 

• 

LET VS GRIND ALL YOUR 
GRAIN FEEDS 

• 

Hazelhurst Feed Mill 

Milford Steinhagen, Owner 
Phone 6-2650 




For Clear Tag Field Seeds contact Ogle Service Company. For 
Heavy Duty Hybrids contact the farmer salesmen in your area. 



Producers Seed Co* 



Polo 
Plant 



General Office 
Hybrid Corn Plants 
Field Seed Plant 



Piper City, 111. 

Piper City and Polo, 111. 

Decatur, 111. 



Page 94 








Bu P.rJS. M o 




PROGRESS 

With 

ELECTRICITY 

* 

Ross L* Hardy 

Phone 6-3732 



Preserve the Present 
by Means of 

Photography 

—WEDDINGS 

—PORTRAITS 

—CHILDREN 

—GROUPS 

—HOME PORTRAITS 

PHOTO FIISISHIISG 

Nordgren Studio 

Bert Nordgren 



Page 95 




i 



ys. 




• i^ 



,'.-^ 



Winter Scene on Mason Street In Wood Sidewalk Days 



1913 



1957 



Reynolds Oil Co» 

Jobbers Petroleum Products 

208 SO. FRANKLIN AVE., POLO, ILL., PHONE 6-1482 



Paee 96 



F 

547 
.03 
P76 



99039 

Polo , Illinois 
Centennial, 1857- 
1957 



SAUK VALLEY COLLEGE LIBRARY 

R.R. 5 

Dixon, IL 61021 



85 Years of Service 



As Your Local 



Insurance Agency 



Men You Know and Trust 




Here YESTERDAY... 




Here TODAY... 




Here TOMORROW... 




Many of the capital slock fire and casualty insurance companies 
represented in our office have been rendering unfailing service in 
time of need for more than half a century. 



NEW ENGLAND LIFE 

First Mutual Life Insurance Company Chartered in America - 1835 

Schryver Insurance Agency 



Mart 



Jim 



Phone 6-3002 



Polo, Illinois 



The Polo National Bank 



Established in 1935 




A Friendly Home Owned Bank 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Archie Diehl 
Paul Graehling 
Arch M. Hamilton 
Price Heckman 



Ross W. Hostetter 
George W. Trump 
Edward M. Tyne 
Harold Typer 



THE OFFICERS 
George W. Trump, President 

Ross W. Hosteller, Exect. Vice President and Cashier 
Price Heckman, Vice President 
Oscar G. Olson, Assistant Cashier 



THE STAFF 



Mrs. Buell T. Brodie 
Mrs. Kenneth Dunn 
Mrs. Henry Doyle 




Miss Evelyn Shrader 
Miss Helen M. Ports 
Mrs. Bruce Wright 



We Render All Banking Services